New scarlet snake found in Cambodia

Jul 16, 2012
A new species of snake pictured in Cambodia's southwest Cardamom Mountains, in a picture taken on January 27, 2011 and released by conservation group Fauna and Flora International (FFI) on July 16, 2012. The new species of snake was discovered in Cambodia's rainforest, conservationists announced Monday.

A new species of snake which is scarlet with black and white rings has been discovered in Cambodia's rainforest, conservationists announced on Monday.

The , which has been named the Cambodian Kukri, was found in the southwest Cardamom Mountains, an area under threat from , Fauna & Flora International (FFI) said in a statement.

Kukri snakes are so named because their curved rear fangs -- designed to puncture eggs -- are similar in shape to the Nepalese kukri knife, FFI said.

"Most kukri snakes are dull-coloured," said Neang Thy, one of the herpetologists who discovered the new species. "But this one is dark red with black and white rings, making it a beautiful snake."

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