Related topics: plos one · species · climate change

US officials seek limits on "habitat" for imperiled species

The Trump administration is moving to restrict what land and water areas can be declared as "habitat" for imperiled plants and animals—potentially excluding locations that species could use in the future as climate change ...

Migratory river fish populations down 76% since 1970

Populations of migratory river fish collapsed by 76 percent on average in the last 50 years, according to a report by conservation groups Tuesday, warning the "catastrophic" declines could impact people and ecosystems around ...

Madagascar: New mouse lemur species discovered

Madagascar is a biodiversity hotspot. In the last 20 years new lemur species have been discovered while forested habitats have been quickly disappearing. Recent reports by the IUCN (International Union for the Conservation ...

New reintroduction tactics boost eastern quoll survival rate

An experimental research project led by researchers from The Australian National University (ANU) has found a new way to boost the survival rates of eastern quolls reintroduced to the Australian Capital Territory.

DNA helps conservation of elusive tequila bat

Scientists studying the near-threatened tequila bat, best known for its vital role in pollinating the Blue Agave plant from which the drink of the same name is made from, have analyzed its DNA to help inform conservationists ...

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Habitat destruction

Habitat destruction is the process in which natural habitat is rendered functionally unable to support the species present. In this process, plants and animals which previously used the site are displaced or destroyed, reducing biodiversity. Agriculture is the principal cause of habitat destruction. Other important causes of habitat destruction include mining, logging, trawling and urban sprawl. Habitat destruction is currently ranked as the most important cause of species extinction worldwide. It is a process of environmental change important in evolution and conservation biology. Additional causes include habitat fragmentation, geological processes, climate change, invasive species, ecosystem nutrient change and human activities mentioned below.

The terms "loss of habitat" and there is also a "habitat reduction" are also used in a wider sense including loss of habitat from other factors, such as water and noise pollution.

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