Obama proposes $1B for science, math teachers

Jul 18, 2012 by JOSH LEDERMAN
President Barack Obama pauses as he is applauded during his speech at a fundraising event at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center in San Antonio, Texas, Tuesday, July 17, 2012. Obama is spending the day fundraising in Texas. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

(AP) — The Obama administration unveiled plans Wednesday to create an elite corps of master teachers, a $1 billion (€810 million) effort to boost U.S. students' achievement in science, technology, engineering and math.

The program to reward high-performing with salary stipends is part of a long-term effort by President Barack Obama to encourage education in high-demand areas that hold the key to future economic growth — and to close the achievement gap between American students and their international peers.

Teachers selected for the Master Teacher Corps will be paid an additional $20,000 (€16,000) a year and must commit to participate multiple years. The goal is to create a multiplier effect in which expert educators share their knowledge and skills with other teachers, improving the quality of education for all students.

The administration will make $100 million available immediately out of an existing fund to incentivize top-performing teachers. Over the longer term, the White House said it plans to launch the program with $1 billion included in Obama's budget request for fiscal year 2013.

But the House and Senate both voted down Obama's budget earlier in the year, making it far from certain that Obama will be able to get congressional approval to spend $1 billion on master teachers.

A report released in February by the President's Council of Advisers on Science and Technology found that the U.S. must increase by 34 percent the number of students receiving degrees in , math and related fields to keep up with economic demand.

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AWaB
1 / 5 (1) Jul 18, 2012
Another waste of money. Paying the people more who already attempt to teach the maths and sciences isn't going to improve the outcomes. IF they want to improve the teaching, they need to hire people with math, science, and engineering degrees, NOT education degrees. The current teacher pay scales aren't competitive with industry pay so they'll never get the numbers of STEM-educated people that they are looking for.
ryggesogn2
3 / 5 (2) Jul 18, 2012
Why?
To train engineers to work outside the USA?
The present socialist regime is doing its best destroy opportunities for any students the teachers would graduate.