A cluster of twenty atoms of gold visualized for the first time

Jul 26, 2012
The tetrahedron of 20 gold atoms. Image credit: University of Birmingham

(Phys.org) -- Scientists at the University of Birmingham have developed a method to visualise gold on the nanoscale by using a special probe beam to image 20 atoms of gold bound together to make a cluster. The research is published today in the Royal Society of Chemistry’s journal Nanoscale.

Physicists have theorised for many years how of and other elements would be arranged and ten years ago the structure of a 20-atom tetrahedral pyramid was proposed by scientists in the US. Birmingham physicists can now reveal this atomic arrangement for the first time by imaging the cluster with an electron microscope.

Gold is a noble metal which is unreactive and thus resistant to contamination in our every day experience, but at the smallest, nano scale it becomes highly active chemically and can be used as a catalyst for controlling chemical reactions.

Clusters of metal atoms are used in catalysis in various industries including oil refining, the food industry, fine chemicals, perfumery and pharmaceuticals as well as in fuel cells for clean power systems for cars.

Richard Palmer, the University of Birmingham’s Professor of Experimental Physics, Head of the Physics Research Laboratory, and lead investigator, said: "We are working to drive up the rate of production of these very precisely defined nano-objects to supply to companies for applications such as catalysis. Selective processes generate less waste and avoid harmful biproducts – this is green chemistry using gold."

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User comments : 4

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Scottingham
1 / 5 (3) Jul 26, 2012
Atomic theory is just that, a THEORY. Everybody knows that matter is the result of God's magic laser beam from outer space.
Shootist
not rated yet Jul 26, 2012
So the single gold atoms used to write IBM back, what, 25 years ago, doesn't count?
SatanLover
not rated yet Jul 26, 2012
was that a response to tetrahedron?
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (2) Jul 27, 2012
So the single gold atoms used to write IBM back, what, 25 years ago, doesn't count?

No it doesn't. Let me quote from the article:
Physicists have theorised for many years how atoms of gold and other elements would be arranged and ten years ago the structure of a 20-atom tetrahedral pyramid was proposed

This is not about atomic scale imaging. This is about verifying a theory on how atoms arrange themselves USING atomic scale imaging.

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