SKorea claims East Asia's oldest farming site

Jun 27, 2012
This May 25, 2012 photo released by South Korea's Cultural Heritage Administration shows the remains of an old farm house in Goseong, 150 kilometers (93.2 miles) east of Seoul, South Korea. Archaeologist Cho Mi-soon said Wednesday, June, 27, 2012, that South Korea's archaeological agency found the remains of a farming field from the Neolithic period on South Korea's east coast. The site may be up to 5,600 years old which is more than 2,000 years older than what is now the second-oldest known site, which also is in South Korea. The white lines drawn with paint on the ground indicate the outline of where the house once stood, according to Administration officials. (AP Photo/Cultural Heritage Administration)

(AP) — South Korea's archaeological agency says it has unearthed evidence of East Asia's oldest known farming site.

Archaeologist Cho Mi-soon said Wednesday that the agency has found the remains of a farming field from the Neolithic period on South Korea's east coast. The site may be up to 5,600 years old. That's more than 2,000 years older than what is now the second-oldest known site, which also is in South Korea.

During the Neolithic period humans began living in permanent settlements and farming after a previous nomadic existence of hunting and gathering.

SKorea claims East Asia's oldest farming site
This May 21, 2012 photo released by South Korea's Cultural Heritage Administration, shows an aerial view of recently found remains of a farming field, in Goseong, 150 kilometers (93.2 miles) east of Seoul, South Korea. Archaeologist Cho Mi-soon said Wednesday, June 27, 2012, that South Korea's archaeological agency found the remains of the farming field from the Neolithic period on South Korea's east coast. The site may be up to 5,600 years old which is more than 2,000 years older than what is now the second-oldest known site, which also is in South Korea. The blue and white lines in the photos were drawn with paint at the site. The white lines on the bottom portion of the land indicate ground that was first cultivated and the blue lines indicate ground that was later cultivated after layers of soil settled on it over time, according to Administration officials. (AP Photo/Cultural Heritage Administration)

Cho points to traces of pottery and house remains found at the site as proof of its age. She says material was tested and determined to be from the .

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