Ancient human ancestor Australopithecus sediba had unique diet: study

Jun 27, 2012
A high-tech dental analysis of a 2-million-year-old hominid from South Africa involving CU-Boulder researchers indicates it had a unique diet that included trees, bushes and fruits. Credit: Paul Sandberg, University of Colorado

When it came to eating, an upright, 2-million-year-old African hominid had a diet unlike virtually all other known human ancestors, says a study led by the Max Planck Institute of Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany and involving the University of Colorado Boulder.

The study indicated that sediba -- a short, gangly hominid that lived in South Africa -- ate harder foods than other , targeting trees, bushes and fruits. In contrast, virtually all other ancient tested from Africa -- including Paranthropus boisei, dubbed "" because of its massive jaws and teeth -- focused more on grasses and sedges, said CU-Boulder doctoral student Paul Sandberg, a co-author on the new study.

The A. sediba diet was analyzed using a technique that involved zapping with a laser, said Sandberg. The laser frees telltale carbon from the enamel of teeth, allowing scientists to pinpoint the types of plants that were consumed and the environments in which the hominids lived. The carbon signals from the teeth are split into two groups: C3 plants like trees, shrubs and bushes preferred by A. sediba, and like grasses and sedges consumed by many other early hominids.

The teeth from the two A. sediba individuals analyzed in the study had values outside the range of all 81 previously tested hominids. "The lack of any C4 evidence, and the evidence for the consumption of hard objects, are what make the inferred diet of these individuals compelling," said Sandberg.

"It is an important finding because diet is one of the fundamental aspects of an animal, one that drives its behavior and . As environments change over time because of shifting climates, animals are generally forced to either move or to adapt to their new surroundings," said Sandberg of CU-Boulder's anthropology department.

The researchers concluded from their scientific tests that bark and other fracture-resistant foods were at least a seasonal part of the A. sediba diet. While bark and woody tissues had not been previously documented as a dietary component of any other ancient African hominids, such foods are consumed by many contemporary primates and contain both protein and soluble sugars. The diet of A. sediba may have been similar to that of today's African savanna chimpanzees, Sandberg said.

One unique aspect of the project was the analysis of microscopic, fossilized particles of plant tissue known as phytoliths trapped in ancient tooth tarter, a hardened form of dental plaque, said corresponding study author Amanda Henry of the Institute for .

"The fact that these phytoliths are preserved in the teeth of 2-million-year-old hominids is remarkable and speaks to the amazing preservation at the site," said Sandberg. "The phytolith data suggest the A. sediba individuals were avoiding the grasses growing in open grasslands that were abundant in the region at the time."

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A third, independent line of study -- analyzing microscopic pits and scratches on A. sediba teeth, which reveal what they were eating at the time just prior to death -- also confirmed that at least one of the hominids was eating harder foods, said Sandberg.

A paper on the subject was published online by Nature on June 27. Other paper authors included Professor Matt Sponheimer of CU-Boulder, Peter Ungar of the University of Arkansas, Benjamin Passey of Johns Hopkins University, Lloyd Rossouw of the Bloemfontein National Museum in Bloemfontein, South Africa, Lee Berger and Marion Bamford of the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa and Darryl de Ruiter of Texas A&M University.

A. sediba is particularly intriguing to anthropologists. The first two individuals discovered -- a juvenile male and an adult female from the Malapa Cave site roughly 30 miles north of Johannesburg in 2008 --apparently had fallen into a hidden pit in the cave and died. With an upright posture and long arms, the curious creature appears to have characteristics of both primitive and modern hominids, including a human-like ankle, short fingers and a long thumb for possible precision gripping and a relatively complex brain compared to earlier hominids, according to researchers.

The jury is still out on exactly where these hominids land on the family tree. A. sediba may have been a descendant of A. africanus, which was spawned by A. afarensis, a hominid represented by "Lucy" who lived about 3 million years ago and is considered by many to be the matriarch of the human family.

The A. sediba remains at Malapa were dated to 2 million years by scientists, a precise number obtained by measuring the decay of isotopes of uranium into lead that occurred in a type of mineral deposit known as flowstone that capped the fossil-bearing layer.

Paleontological evidence, including pollen and phytoliths, shows that the region around Malapa likely was a mix of abundant grassland and woody vegetation about 2 million years ago, said Sandberg. The team's carbon isotope research on the ancient teeth of rodents and hooved mammals that inhabited the region at the time indicated they had a strong affinity for C4 grasses and sedges.

"What fascinates me is that these individuals are oddballs," said CU-Boulder's Sponheimer. "I had pretty much convinced myself that after 4 million years ago most of our hominid kin had diets that were different from living apes, but now I am not so sure. And while our sample is too small to be conclusive, the rate at which Malapa is spewing hominid fossils makes me reasonably certain we won't have to wait another 2 million years to augment our data set. "

Explore further: Archaeologists, tribe clash over Native remains

More information: DOI: 10.1038/nature11185

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User comments : 6

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joe_belmont_1961
1 / 5 (2) Jun 27, 2012
Really chewed on leaves like let me guess... chewing tobacco?
Anorion
2.3 / 5 (3) Jun 27, 2012
Really chewed on leaves like let me guess... chewing tobacco?


The ~2 million year old fossil is from Africa, Tobacco plant is originate from Americas and even tough used by native Americans , it was unknown in rest of the world till arrival of Europeans who then propagated it in the rest of the world and popularized its use. So no, he couldn't have chewed Tobacco leaves, there wasn't any at that time, on that continent, at least.
Torbjorn_Larsson_OM
3 / 5 (1) Jun 27, 2012
They need to get more analyses done of course, with two related individuals the "sample is too small to be conclusive". Interestingly it may point to increased and local adaptability in diets. Cultural kitchens, as it were. Such a thing ties the australopithecines closer to the humans that they or their cousins spawned.

Some other researcher pointed out that giraffes also show C3 due to its leave diet but isn't a woodland creature anymore than A. sediba was.
lampreya
3 / 5 (1) Jun 29, 2012
For modern Homo sapiens tree or treebark as food is not as remarkable as it seems. See recent article in 'NordicScience': "Mystical marks in virgin forest explained" by Nina Kristiansen. June 27, 2012. The bark of pines were once used as a food supplement by the indigenous Sami living in Scandinavia. Arve Elvebakk of the University of Tromsø headed a study to find out why trees had lost part of their bark.
Mastoras
not rated yet Jul 16, 2012
Really chewed on leaves like let me guess... chewing tobacco?


The ~2 million year old fossil is from Africa, Tobacco plant is originate from Americas ... So no, he couldn't have chewed Tobacco leaves, there wasn't any at that time, on that continent, at least.


That is correct. But I believe he mentioned tobbaco trying to make a joke!
Mastoras
not rated yet Jul 16, 2012
For modern Homo sapiens tree or treebark as food is not as remarkable as it seems.

Well, I think it is remarkable, because modern humans cannot digest wood. They lack the necessary enzyme-what-they-call-it.
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