Single-inlet electric vehicle charging to showcase in LA

May 05, 2012 by Nancy Owano report
Single-inlet EV charging to showcase in LA

(Phys.org) -- Big names in global car manufacturers have announced a common method for charging electric vehicles. The companies are in agreement with a common charging technology for use on electric vehicles in Europe and the United States. The new method will provide special convenience by enabling car owners to charge their EVs using AC or DC from a single inlet. The charging system will allow for both alternating current and faster direct current charging on the same port. Another feature of the new system is that the charge can be done in faster time; a battery charge will take only 15 to 20 minutes.

Audi, , BMW, Chrysler, Daimler, Ford, Porsche, and are the who support the technology, which will be showcased next week at the Electric Vehicle Symposium (EVS) in Los Angeles, from May 6 to May 9.

The first vehicles to use the system are expected next year. Vehicles are already in development that will be capable of using the new system. The charging solution is titled "DC Fast Charging with a Combined Charging System” or Combined Charging System, for short. An EVS statement says this is a step forward in reducing complexity with its combined AC and DC charging. “One vehicle inlet, one control logic, one communication path, and one electric architecture.” The LA event will show vehicles and charge pumps for the Combined Charging System.

According to reports, the system was developed for all international vehicle markets. Uniformity was key, with identical electrical systems, charge controllers, package dimensions and safety mechanisms.

Numerous auto blogs point to the announcement as good news for an EV industry trying to achieve wider consumer adoption by coming up with practical solutions for battery charging.

Car buyers understandably are skittish about not having available charging opportunities on longer drives or about charging waits. The new method takes15 to 20 minutes to power up a car using a similar standard.

The charging system integrates one-phase AC-charging, fast three-phase AC-charging, DC-charging at home and ultra-fast DC-charging at public stations into one vehicle inlet.

The International Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) has chosen the Combined Charging System as a standard that incrementally extends existing Type 1-based AC charging The standard is to be officially published this summer. ACEA, the European association of vehicle manufacturers, has chosen the Combined Charging System as its AC/DC charging interface for new vehicle types in Europe as of 2017.

According to a Chrysler release, the timeline is as follows: Commercially available combined charging units are projected for later this year. All committed OEMs have vehicles in development that will use the Combined . The first vehicles to use this system will reach the market in 2013.

Explore further: An innovative system anticipates driver fatigue in the vehicle to prevent accidents

Related Stories

Fast charging station for electric vehicles

Apr 05, 2011

Siemens has launched a new electric-vehicle charging station on the market that can fully recharge a battery within one hour. By doubling the output to 22 kilowatts, the charging station cuts charging times ...

Qualcomm's HaloIPT tech brings wireless charging for EVs

Jan 16, 2012

(PhysOrg.com) -- Qualcomm has demonstrated its new wireless power transmission system for electric vehicles (EVs) at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES). The system, including one pad for power transmitting, ...

4.7 million EV charging units expected by 2015

Jun 08, 2010

The first affordable mass-produced electric vehicles will hit the streets of America later this year. Once the Nissan Leaf begins to make its way from dealerships to consumers, the electric vehicle charging revolution will ...

Cable-free charging of electric cars via coils

Apr 11, 2011

In the future, motorists will no longer need a cable to recharge the batteries of their electric cars, thanks to a development project for inductive charging, which Siemens presented at Hannover Messe 2011. ...

Recommended for you

Minimising drag to maximise results

3 hours ago

One of the most exciting parts of the Tour de France for spectators is the tactical vying for spots in the breakaway group at the front of the pack.

Catching grease to cut grill pollution

Jul 21, 2014

A team of University of California, Riverside Bourns College of Engineering students have designed a tray that when placed under the grates of a backyard grill reduces by 70 percent the level of a harmful ...

User comments : 17

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Husky
5 / 5 (2) May 05, 2012
15-20 minutes is acceptable if you are on a long journey, like holiday, you want want to have a short break anyway after a couple of hours of driving, however, broad availlabillity of fast chargers, especially near the work place is paramount. What the French government is doing, they buy a lot of electric cars for their departments so they have a good reason installing those charges throughout the country, solving the chicken/egg problem, and they use their own car industrie and own nuclear power, to provide the cars/juice
Eikka
1.8 / 5 (5) May 05, 2012
What is the design power rating for the connector and the cable?

You can't say it's 15-20 minutes without knowing how big the battery is, and how much power you can pull through. It's misleading to put any time figures on it, because when batteries double in capacity in the future, your charging times double.

Equally well, they might clock the system with a battery half the size. It's the same sort of shenanigans as with the range tests that use testing standards that are deliberately chosen to inflate the numbers.

Code_Warrior
5 / 5 (1) May 05, 2012
While a common charging system standard is critical for practical EV technology, I am curious about some notable companies that are absent from the supporter's list - Namely Toyota, Nissan, Hyundai, Kia, Tata, and Subaru. Do they have a competing standard?
Sonhouse
3 / 5 (2) May 05, 2012
To say nothing of the idea that batteries have to be able to TAKE that kind of quick charge, not overheat, not reduce the lifespan and so forth. To pick a quick number, if you have a 25 Kw/hr battery and it needs charging then to do it in one hour you need a supply capable of giving 1000 volts at 25 amps for that hour, or 100 volts at 250 amps. But say you want to do it in 1/4 hour, then you need a supply capable of putting out 100 Kw continuously for 15 minutes. That would be 1000 volts at 100 amps or 100 volts at 1000 amps, take your pick. 10 volts at 10,000 amps, and so forth.
That is a lot of power to have to supply and that is only for one car. If you have ten charging stations, now you are up to needing one megawatt. 100 cars, 10 megawatts, 1000 cars 100 megawatts, 10,000 cars one Gigawatt. 10,000,000 cars, one Terawatt. Where do you get that kind of energy?
At least, the quick charger if used 24/7 can charge almost one hundred cars per day but probably won't be that efficient.
Sonhouse
3 / 5 (2) May 05, 2012
Obviously, it would get most of its use in the morning ride to work and going home after work, then on weekends. So at 2 in the morning, there probably won't be a lot of cars being charged at a public station.

So it is more likely such a public station would charge more like 50 cars a day. That would mean to charge 10,000,000 cars would require something like 200,000 chargers running 12/7 or so. One megawatt for one day would be 24 megawatt hours of power, divide by 2 gives you 12 megawatt hours 24/7 times 200,000 is 2.4 Petawatt hours of energy 24/7 to supply 10 million cars. Of course in the US there may be even more cars than that. Don't know how many cars there are in Europe, but suppose it worked out to 200,000,000 cars world wide, now you need 2.4 EXA watt hours 24/7 just for cars. Them R a LOT of energy:)
Telekinetic
1.3 / 5 (3) May 05, 2012
"So it is more likely such a public station would charge more like 50 cars a day. That would mean to charge 10,000,000 cars would require something like 200,000 chargers running 12/7 or so."-Sonhouse

I see, the charging stations would have only one stanchion, with a line of cars waiting 20 minutes for each car ahead of them. One thing that puzzles me is how die-hard capitalists can't see how electric vehicles will be profitable when the government mandates zero emission laws for vehicles. It's an opportunity for automakers to cash in on the inevitable change in the law and marketplace (like shooting fish in a barrel). All of the technical problems, like limited operation and long charging times will be solved, coinciding with, hopefully, the consumer's financial ability to buy an electric vehicle. Why does it take a socialist to explain the not-so-intricate intricacies of capitalism?
Josue
not rated yet May 05, 2012
Are the creators of the combined charging system thinking on the future compatibility with the smart grid?
energy.gov/oe/technology-development/smart-grid
Sonhouse
not rated yet May 06, 2012
"So it is more likely such a public station would charge more like 50 cars a day. That would mean to charge 10,000,000 cars would require something like 200,000 chargers running 12/7 or so."-Sonhouse

I see, the charging stations would have only one stanchion, with a line of cars waiting 20 minutes for each car ahead of them. One thing that puzzles me is how die-hard capitalists can't see how electric vehicles will be profitable when the government mandates zero emission laws for vehicles. It's an opportunity for automakers to cash in on the inevitable change in the law and marketplace (like shooting fish in a barrel). All of the technical problems, like limited operation and long charging times will be solved, coinciding with, hopefully, the consumer's financial ability to buy an electric vehicle. Why does it take a socialist to explain the not-so-intricate intricacies of capitalism?


You didn't get the part where I was talking about a single station? Obviously we need more.
Sonhouse
not rated yet May 06, 2012
So where does your socialistic mind envision the energy coming from?
How many charging stations would you think a station should have? Right now you are lucky if your local gas station has 6 pumps. So with 6 chargers, now that station could do maybe 300 cars per day, but you still need megawatts to feed the cars. That is just one station.
italba
3 / 5 (2) May 06, 2012
If you CAN quick charge your car, it doesn't mean you HAVE TO! You should normally slow charge at night, when the energy costs less.
italba
3 / 5 (2) May 06, 2012
Or, better, transform the current gas stations in battery-swap stations. You could just drive in, drop the exausted battery and take a fresh charged one in less time you need to fill your tank. The station will recharge your battery for the next car, maybe with solar or wind energy.
antialias_physorg
4 / 5 (2) May 06, 2012
To say nothing of the idea that batteries have to be able to TAKE that kind of quick charge,

Since these car manufacurers are the ones that will provide the cars I'd say they can make such a claim (knowing the specs).

Batteries are made up of many cells (that's why they are called 'batteries' in the first place). It would be rather simple to disconnect and charge all cells in parallel (provided the outlet can deliver enough juice).
That's what you do when you charge your reusable batteries at home: Take them from a device that uses them in series and put them in a parallel charger.
So the size of the battery doesn't really matter for charging times.
Physphan
not rated yet May 06, 2012
Electricity is much more easily transported than oil products. The energy required to move vehicles is roughly the same no matter the type of energy. I'm thinking it is an important first step to standardize the chargers so most makes can use it, then the energy needed will be a matter of building a suitable infrastructure for the current required...and that WILL happen when the demand is there. I also agree that MOST charging will be slow and relatively low current. This is a great advancement to have the CAPABILITY engineered for fast charging when that is needed (mostly long trips).
Telekinetic
1 / 5 (1) May 06, 2012
"So where does your socialistic mind envision the energy coming from?"- Sonhouse

"...then the energy needed will be a matter of building a suitable infrastructure for the current required...and that WILL happen when the demand is there."-Physphan

I have laryngitis from making long-winded speeches at the socialist rally.
unknownorgin
1 / 5 (1) May 07, 2012
I thought the idea of having an electric car that you never buy gas for was a great idea until I realized I would need $30,000 for the solar panels to charge the car in a resonable time period. When you multiply the power demands by a million cars it is clear to see the real costs of an electric fleet can only be paid for using vehicles that generate profit such as public transportation and freight hauling. It is not reasonable to expect the electric car owner to be able to pay for new infrastructure by way of fees and taxes in todays economy.
antialias_physorg
not rated yet May 07, 2012
Electricity is much more easily transported than oil products.

To a point. However, if we really want to have all automobiles charge off the grid then the grid will need a serious upgrade. Power companies should have started on that decades ago.
and that WILL happen when the demand is there

I'm not so sure. Power companies like their power infrastructure the way it is. It's a cash cow. Augmenting it does not generate additional revenue fast enough (at least not faster than investing the money for it elsewhere in the stock market)

I would need $30,000 for the solar panels
When did you do those calculatons? Prices for panels have dropped by 75% in the last three years. Even if you just buy your energy off the grid it's way cheaper than pumping gas.
unknownorgin
1 / 5 (1) May 09, 2012
one horse power is 746 watts times 40 HP =37,300 watts. With no losses (impossible) 30,000 watt output solar panels will take over one hour to charge car to run one hour (highway speed)so if you only paid $1 per watt for solar panels you would pay $30,000 and this would be a bargain and would not include cost of hardware and control electronics.