Hubble spies edge-on beauty

May 21, 2012
Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

(Phys.org) -- Visible in the constellation of Andromeda, NGC 891 is located approximately 30 million light-years away from Earth. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope turned its powerful wide field Advanced Camera for Surveys towards this spiral galaxy and took this close-up of its northern half. The galaxy's central bulge is just out of the image on the bottom left.

The galaxy, spanning some 100,000 light-years, is seen exactly edge-on, and reveals its thick plane of dust and . While initially thought to look like our own Milky Way if seen from the side, more detailed surveys revealed the existence of filaments of dust and gas escaping the plane of the galaxy into the halo over hundreds of light-years. They can be clearly seen here against the bright background of the galaxy halo, expanding into space from the disk of the galaxy.

Astronomers believe these filaments to be the result of the ejection of material due to supernovae or intense activity. By lighting up when they are born, or exploding when they die, stars cause powerful winds that can blow dust and gas over hundreds of light-years in space.

A few foreground stars from the Milky Way shine brightly in the image, while distant can be seen in the lower right of the image.

NGC 891 is part of a small group of galaxies bound together by gravity.

A version of this image was entered into the Hubble’s Hidden Treasures Image Processing Competition by contestant Nick Rose. Hidden Treasures is an initiative to invite astronomy enthusiasts to search the Hubble archive for stunning images that have never been seen by the general public.

Explore further: Next-generation Thirty Meter Telescope begins construction in Hawaii

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User comments : 16

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Tuxford
1 / 5 (12) May 21, 2012
'Astronomers believe these filaments to be the result of the ejection of material due to supernovae or intense stellar formation activity.'

Blah, blah, blah. Read: they have not got a clue. But don't worry. They will soon have an explanation. And you can bet it will include expanding space-time mathematical nonsense.
jsdarkdestruction
4.6 / 5 (7) May 21, 2012
compared to your ancient alien based science fiction fantasy world laviolette made for you?
Caliban
3.7 / 5 (3) May 21, 2012

I notice that these filaments appear to have a fairly regular frequency, like the teeth of a comb or a fishbone diagram,
both above and below the galactic plane.

This would seem to indicate that they form along the centerlines of the spiral arms, perpendicular to the G.P.

Why would that be?

Norezar
5 / 5 (1) May 21, 2012
'Astronomers believe these filaments to be the result of the ejection of material due to supernovae or intense stellar formation activity.'

Blah, blah, blah. Read: they have not got a clue. But don't worry. They will soon have an explanation. And you can bet it will include expanding space-time mathematical nonsense.


Dark Matter is the El NiƱo of space.
MandoZink
5 / 5 (2) May 21, 2012
I notice that these filaments appear to have a fairly regular frequency, like the teeth of a comb or a fishbone diagram,
both above and below the galactic plane.

This would seem to indicate that they form along the centerlines of the spiral arms, perpendicular to the G.P.

Why would that be?


It might be that portions of spiral arms are moving together in the same carousel motion that our solar system traverses around the Milky Way. Some arms are currently above the galactic plane, some below. One possibility is that the merger of two galaxies with different angles of rotation might cause such filaments to end up in a carousel motion about the G.P.

An edge-on view of filaments with that motion might resemble what you see. Just a guess.
Russkiycremepuff
1 / 5 (1) May 21, 2012
compared to your ancient alien based science fiction fantasy world laviolette made for you?
- jsdark -

Please explain this ancient alien. I have not heard of this before.
jsdarkdestruction
4.3 / 5 (3) May 21, 2012
alright, tuxford believes aliens came and visited the planet and pretty much started civilization and that their are secret codes in the stars made by these being for laviolette to find and interpret that explain the universe. these being also "visited on another realm" laviolette and gave him a medal in their realm for decoding it.
yyz
5 / 5 (5) May 21, 2012
"I notice that these filaments appear to have a fairly regular frequency....both above and below the galactic plane. This would seem to indicate that they form along the centerlines of the spiral arms, perpendicular to the G.P.

Why would that be? "

The energy sources driving gas and dust from the plane of NGC 891 are thought to be young starforming regions (clusters and stellar associations) and supernovae, both of which are predominantly found in the plane of the galaxy as seen from Earth (and largely hidden from direct view by dust). Hydrodynamic mechanisms, that create so-called wall and chimney structures seen in galaxies, as well as radiation pressure are thought to be partly responsible for shaping much of the extraplanar gas and dust seen in the image.

There is also some evidence of magnetic fields playing a role in the observed structure of the dust filaments. Undoubtedly several mechanisms are responsible for driving this material out of the galactic plane.

(con't)



yyz
5 / 5 (5) May 21, 2012
(con't)

Several studies of NGC 891 have noted that the H-alpha gas filaments and dusty dark filaments don't align and occur independently of each other. This morphology may indicate the presence of a "chaotic" starburst disk in this galaxy, similar to that seen, at a more favorable inclination, in NGC 7793: http://www.eso.or...914b.jpg

A couple of good refs looking at extraplanar gas and dust in NGC 891:

http://arxiv.org/...01v1.pdf

http://arxiv.org/...97v1.pdf
Russkiycremepuff
1 / 5 (1) May 22, 2012
alright, tuxford believes aliens came and visited the planet and pretty much started civilization and that their are secret codes in the stars made by these being for laviolette to find and interpret that explain the universe. these being also "visited on another realm" laviolette and gave him a medal in their realm for decoding it.

alright, tuxford believes aliens came and visited the planet and pretty much started civilization and that their are secret codes in the stars made by these being for laviolette to find and interpret that explain the universe. these being also "visited on another realm" laviolette and gave him a medal in their realm for decoding it.
= jsdark -

I do not particularly believe in space aliens coming to earth and giving someone a medal, but GhostofOtto, in another thread, posted a link to The Book of Enoch. Perhaps the "angels" in the book were actually space aliens who came to earth and took human wives and had half human children who were giants
Russkiycremepuff
1 / 5 (1) May 22, 2012
It was interesting to read anyway, but I have attempted to understand if the "angels" were from another world, or were they supernatural beings from the heaven. But I have another question: I enlarged the picture in the article, then I enlarged it again to see the galaxy better. It was then that I noticed that away from the light of the galaxy toward the darker corners of the picture, there seems to be brownish noise that fills the picture. Would that be the CMBR? Or could it be Dark Matter? It is everywhere in the picture and does not seem to end anywhere. The filaments are interesting, of course. But this "brown noise" that gets darker away from light of galaxy is very puzzling. Is it just a product of the dust also, or is it something else? It has a chaotic pattern.
jsdarkdestruction
not rated yet May 22, 2012
or perhaps it's just a story......seems the most likely explanation imo.
jsdarkdestruction
not rated yet May 22, 2012
here are some works from tuxfords idol laviolette, it illustrates how based in reality his worldview really is.this is a book he wrote.
First time proof of the existence of interstellar radio signals of intelligent origin being sent to us.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Evidence that pulsars are part of a vast network of ETI communication beacons.
This exhaustive study presents first time proof that astronomers have been receiving radio signals of intelligent origin. As early as 1967 and continuing to the present, radio astronomers have been carefully studying and cataloging unusual interstellar beacons called pulsars thinking them to be stars of natural origin. Dr. LaViolette, who has been researching pulsars for 27 years, shows that, up to now, the nature of these radio sources has been grossly misunderstood. He has discovered that a number of very unique pulsars are nonrandomly distributed in the sky and mark key Galactic locat
jsdarkdestruction
not rated yet May 22, 2012
-locations that have particular significance from an ETI communication standpoint. He also presents evidence of unusual geometric alignments among pulsars and intriguing pulse period relationships. Equally compelling is the message they are sending-a warning about a past Galactic core explosion disaster that should help us avert a future global tragedy.

Contains extensive analysis of pulsar data, revealing new ideas about the origins and functions of pulsars

Provides proof of an extraterrestrial communication network

Includes information about the formation of crop circles and force-field-beaming technology

see, this is what i mean about science fiction fantasy based worldview that laviolette employs in his cosmological theories. and all the others fields of science he's claimed to make breakthroughs in because of it while having no training in the fields he claims to have proven wrong.
Tuxford
1 / 5 (2) May 22, 2012
Dark, didn't you get over bullying in high school. Grow up.
jsdarkdestruction
not rated yet May 22, 2012
hehe, naw, i didnt get bullied. even if i had been bullied my social status in high school does nothing about the substantial amount of material ive posted that shows how reality based paul laviolettes worldview is. nothing at all. thanks though, it does make it seem damning that you cannot defend it because everything ive said is true and came right from laviolette's own "works".