Hubble image of galaxies' El Dorado

March 12, 2012
Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

(PhysOrg.com) -- NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has produced this beautiful image of the galaxy NGC 1483. NGC 1483 is a barred spiral galaxy located in the southern constellation of Dorado — the dolphinfish (or Mahi-mahi fish) in Spanish. The nebulous galaxy features a bright central bulge and diffuse arms with distinct star-forming regions. In the background, many other distant galaxies can be seen.

The constellation Dorado is home to the Dorado Group of galaxies, a loose group comprised of an estimated 70 galaxies and located some 62 million light-years away. The Dorado group is much larger than the Local Group that includes the Milky Way (and which contains around 30 galaxies) and approaches the size of a galaxy cluster. Galaxy clusters are the largest groupings of galaxies (and indeed the largest structures of any type) in the universe to be held together by their gravity.

Barred spiral galaxies are so named because of the prominent bar-shaped structures found in their center. They form about two thirds of all spiral galaxies, including the Milky Way. Recent studies suggest that bars may be a common stage in the formation of spiral galaxies, and may indicate that a galaxy has reached full maturity.

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btb101
4.5 / 5 (4) Mar 12, 2012
How can NASA say that the Hubble has reached its shelf life and will consign the ageing telescope to the scrapheap.
the images it produces, the clarity it can define from such far away object should mean that both the James Webb AND Hubble should work side by side to aid in our understanding of the universe.
Hubble deserves to be treated like the old lady of space and kept alive for as long as possible.
Then the world can enjoy amazing images such as these and many many more to come.
SoylentGrin
not rated yet Mar 12, 2012
In a way, I agree, but Hubble is pretty old technology, and is completely blown off the charts by what we can put up in its place.
Provided resources aren't being drained by older technology for what would amount to be sentimental reasons.
CardacianNeverid
3.7 / 5 (6) Mar 13, 2012
How can NASA say that the Hubble has reached its shelf life and will consign the ageing telescope to the scrapheap -btb101

Because there is no maintenance capability anymore. When things (like gyros or power supply) wear out, that's curtains.

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