Ancient plant-fungal partnerships reveal how the world became green

May 15, 2012

Prehistoric plants grown in state-of-the-art growth chambers recreating environmental conditions from more than 400 million years ago have shown scientists from the University of Sheffield how soil dwelling fungi played a crucial role in the evolution of plants.

This ground breaking work provides fundamental knowledge of how plants colonised the land before roots evolved and the co-evolution of one of the most ancient relationships, between fungi and early plants that played a founding role in the evolution of Earth's ecosystems.

The research highlights the importance of mutually beneficial plant-fungal relationships prior to the evolution of roots, whereby plants gain growth-promoting soil phosphorus from the fungi in exchange for sugars fixed by the plant through photosynthesis.

The study compared the efficiencies of plant-fungal relationships in land plant species spanning more than 400 million years of evolution under both modern day and on Earth at the time plants first emerged onto the land.

Lead author Dr Katie Field, of the University's Department of Animal and , said: "Our research shows for the first time how Earth's terrestrial ecosystems were initiated in partnership with fungi nearly half a billion years ago and how these fungi played a crucial role in enabling plants to diversify into fantastically rich and biodiverse modern floras.

"The earliest land plants not only faced ever increasing competition for light with the evolution of new, taller species of plants, but also experienced reduced fungal symbiotic efficiency and subsequently lower total capture of phosphorus as global atmospheric carbon dioxide levels fell.

"In contrast, the fungal symbiotic efficiency of the more sophisticated, recently evolved land plants with complex organs such as leaves and roots, increased as decreased. This would have given them a significant and has led to their dominance of world ecosystems today."

Dr Martin Bidartondo, of the Department of Life Sciences at Imperial College London, an expert in the ecology and evolution of mycorrhizas, one of the most widespread symbioses on Earth, was responsible for the molecular work carried out as part of the research.

Dr Bidartondo added: "We are finally starting to get information on which fungi allowed the colonisation of land by plants and about how they did it. This is because we can now discover which fungal lineages form intimate associations with the oldest groups of plants by using new molecular ecology and evolution approaches".

The scientists used liverworts as representatives of the earliest group of plants to leave the water. These plants have no roots or leaves, do not produce flowers or seeds, and are structurally very similar to fossilised remains of the very first .

A fern was chosen to represent the earliest plants to have both roots and leaves. Finally, a common garden weed – Ribwort Plantain – was chosen as a typical example of the most recently evolved group of plants.

Dr Field said: "Our exciting findings clearly indicate that the co-evolution of complex plant rooting systems and fungal symbioses, against a background of falling , resulted in increased symbiotic efficiency and as such, ensured the success of plants in 'greening the Earth' and their ensuing diversification, creating the wonderfully varied that we are familiar with today."

Explore further: Hermit creepy crawlies: Two new taxa of wood-feeding cockroach from China

Related Stories

How plants learned to respond to changing environments

Jul 12, 2007

A team of John Innes centre scientists lead by Professor Nick Harberd have discovered how plants evolved the ability to adapt to changes in climate and environment. Plants adapt their growth, including key steps in their ...

How did flowering plants evolve to dominate Earth?

Dec 01, 2009

To Charles Darwin it was an 'abominable mystery' and it is a question which has continued to vex evolutionists to this day: when did flowering plants evolve and how did they come to dominate plant life on earth? Today a study ...

Adjustable valves gave ancient plants the edge

Jun 09, 2011

Controlling water loss is an important ability for modern land plants as it helps them thrive in changing environments. New research from the University of Bristol, published today in the journal Current Biology, shows ...

Recommended for you

A vegetarian carnivorous plant

21 hours ago

Carnivorous plants catch and digest tiny animals in order and derive benefits for their nutrition. Interestingly the trend towards vegetarianism seems to overcome carnivorous plants as well. The aquatic carnivorous bladderwort, ...

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

kevinrtrs
1 / 5 (6) May 16, 2012
Unfortunately the whole experiment hangs on whether the recreation of environmental conditions that existed 40 million years ago is possible since no one was there to record the exact conditions. How do they know what the atmospheric pressure was, the exact air composition, the humidity, windspeed, rainfall, magnetic field and sunshine/cloud conditions were, to name just a few variables?
How do they know that earth even existed 40 million years ago?
It all comes down to assumptions which cannot be justified in any manner whatsoever since one can always question them.
Graeme
5 / 5 (1) May 16, 2012
So does this suggest that land plants evolved from lichen, with the green algae component developing a way to become multicellular? and the lichen fungus eventually just being underground?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.