Researchers solve 40-year-old Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry phasing problem

Apr 23, 2012

(Phys.org) -- Scientists at the University of Warwick have developed a computation which simultaneously doubles the resolution, sensitivity and mass accuracy of Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (FTMS) at no extra cost.

Researchers in the University’s Department of Chemistry have solved the 40-year-old phasing problem which allows plotting of spectra in absorption mode.

This breakthrough can be used in all FTMS including FT-ICR, Orbitrap and FT-TOF instruments and will have applications in proteomics, petroleum analysis, metabolomics and pharmaceutical analysis among other fields.

Professor Peter O’Connor, who co-developed the method, said: “We have vastly improved the quality of data available at no extra cost.

 “FTMS is used extensively in the fields of pharmaceuticals, healthcare, industry, natural resources and environmental management so this breakthrough represents a real step towards improving research across the board in these areas.”

The method is detailed in the study Absorption-Mode: The Next Generation of Fourier Transform Mass Spectra published in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

It is co-authored by Professor O’Connor, Yulin Qi, Mark Barrow and Huilin Li from the University of Warwick.

Explore further: Beer quality is no froth and bubble

More information: Paper online: pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ac3000122

Related Stories

Neutralizing HIV function

Nov 03, 2011

(Medical Xpress) -- Northeastern researchers have played a key role in studying how antibodies that neutralize HIV function are structured, a further step in ongoing global efforts by scientists to develop a vaccine for the ...

Radical solution to ‘clip’ addiction

Aug 08, 2011

Accidentally leaving a stainless-steel spatula in an overnight experiment has led to the discovery of a more efficient and environmentally friendly method of producing anti-addiction medications.

Scientists pioneer new method for watching proteins fold

Dec 22, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- A protein’s function depends on both the chains of molecules it is made of and the way those chains are folded. And while figuring out the former is relatively easy, the latter represents ...

Recommended for you

'Global positioning' for molecules

Dec 19, 2014

In everyday life, the global positioning system (GPS) can be employed to reliably determine the momentary location of one en route to the desired destination. Scientists from the Institute of Physical and ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Justsayin
1 / 5 (1) Jun 09, 2012
Bring on the 10X magnitude jump in improved research, as Clayton Christensen theorized will now make way for disruptive innovation!

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.