Work with a unique isotope of hydrogen generates attention in the scientific community

Feb 23, 2012

By delving into the interactions between a hydrogen molecule and muonic hydrogen, the heaviest hydrogen isotope to date, a team of researchers from academia and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory created a popular paper.

The article describes the kinetic isotope effects for muonic hydrogen and deuterium, which differ in mass by a factor of 36.

The article was one of the 20 most accessed articles in the November 2011 on The Journal of Chemical Physics. 

The article's popularity, in part, is because it provides a more detailed account of work published in the prestigious journal, Science.

Explore further: Researchers create materials that reproduce cephalopods' ability to quickly change colors and textures

More information: Fleming, DJ, et al. 2011. "Kinetics of the reaction of the heaviest hydrogen atom with H2, the 4Heμ + H2 → 4HeμH + H reaction: Experiments, accurate quantal calculations, and variational transition state theory, including kinetic isotope effects for a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass."The Journal of Chemical Physics 135(18): 184310-184327.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

World's fastest nickel-based complex

Jul 25, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis and Villanova University designed a nickel-based complex that more than doubled previously reported ...

Fruit flies can detect heavy hydrogen: study

Feb 16, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- A new study by researchers in Greece and the US has found that fruit flies can discriminate between normal and heavy hydrogen (deuterium) isotopes, which adds weight to a new theory of how ...

MTU Paper Among 'Most Accessed' in Advanced Materials

May 11, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- A paper by Michigan Tech faculty member Yun Hang Hu has been ranked among the most accessed articles in the prestigious journal Advanced Materials (impact factor 8.191) for the month of March. ...

Putting the fuel in fuel cells

Sep 12, 2006

Ammonia borane holds promise as a chemical compound to store and release hydrogen in fuel cell-powered vehicles – and it appears stable enough to offset some safety concerns. These findings were presented by Pacific Northwest ...

Recommended for you

A dye with tunable optical characteristics

Sep 12, 2014

Researchers from RIKEN and the University of Tokyo have developed an organic dye molecule with tunable light-absorption and color characteristics. This development promises to open the door to the creation ...

User comments : 0