Work with a unique isotope of hydrogen generates attention in the scientific community

February 23, 2012

By delving into the interactions between a hydrogen molecule and muonic hydrogen, the heaviest hydrogen isotope to date, a team of researchers from academia and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory created a popular paper.

The article describes the kinetic isotope effects for muonic hydrogen and deuterium, which differ in mass by a factor of 36.

The article was one of the 20 most accessed articles in the November 2011 on The Journal of Chemical Physics. 

The article's popularity, in part, is because it provides a more detailed account of work published in the prestigious journal, Science.

Explore further: World's fastest nickel-based complex

More information: Fleming, DJ, et al. 2011. "Kinetics of the reaction of the heaviest hydrogen atom with H2, the 4Heμ + H2 → 4HeμH + H reaction: Experiments, accurate quantal calculations, and variational transition state theory, including kinetic isotope effects for a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass."The Journal of Chemical Physics 135(18): 184310-184327.

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