No-glasses 3-D technology to showcase at CES 2012

Dec 26, 2011 by Nancy Owano report

(PhysOrg.com) -- Stream TV Networks plans to introduce a line of products that feature 3-D viewing without glasses. What’s so special about its announcement, on top of scores of 3-D-without-glasses announcements? The company says it has special technology in the name of Ultra-D, which can do nothing less than shift the way people will view media, according to its CEO.

Ultra- D is the company’s display technology that can carry out realtime conversion of 2-D to 3-D without necessitating the use of special glasses for viewing. What’s more, the technology enables the realtime conversion of 3-D content with glasses to 3-D content without glasses.

The company’s press announcement describes this approach as autostereoscopic 3-D imagery. The company’s Ultra-D is dependent upon custom hardware, middleware techniques and software algorithms to give viewers the instant conversions.

The company says Ultra-D works with Blu-ray, DVD, PC gaming, Internet, cable and satellite content.

The technology allows users the freedom to customize the 3-D effect as well. This will address, the company says, individual differences in spatial perception and reactions in eye comfort.

Complaints about 3-D eye strain and a general reluctance toward wearing special glasses for home viewing appear to be proactively addressed by the company, eager to accent the positive about 3-D’s future.

“Our ultimate goal was to create a solution that addresses existing concerns impeding the adoption of 3-D consumer aversion to expensive glasses, viewer discomfort, variance in individual vision and preference and the slow creation of 3-D content,” said Mathu Rajan, CEO, in announcing a product line-up.

Stream TV Networks plans to unveil Ultra-D at the upcoming CES 2012, from January 10 to January 13. His company’s Ultra-3-D brand, according to the press release, includes 3D-enabled TVs, tablets, PCs, smartphones, digital signage and picture frames. More information about this product line will be revealed at the company’s January 9 press conference at CES 2012.

Rajan believes his company’s technology is going to turn the corner on a scale comparable to when consumers transitioned from black and white to color TV.

If so, he will prove to have more vision than media industry skeptics who may see 3-D television as a highly touted technology but not highly entrenched in people’s homes.

According to a November survey by Retrevo, 55 percent of those who said they were going to buy an HDTV in 2012 said they will not buy a 3-D TV; respondents partly blamed their reluctance on a paucity of content and requirement to wear 3-D glasses.

In interviews elsewhere, media company executives have said they thought 3-D television was still a niche but they also saw the possibility of a rise in an installed base of 3-D TVs with Internet connectivity. They see more 3-D action after 2012.

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More information: Press release

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User comments : 24

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HydraulicsNath
4 / 5 (4) Dec 26, 2011
Sounds Awesome!
Kedas
2.5 / 5 (6) Dec 26, 2011
"Real-time conversion of 2D to 3D and 3D with glasses to 3D without glasses"
This 3D to 3D conversion makes me think that it won't be real 3D but some in between solution. If you have 2 images you just provide them to the right eye, no conversion needed. And I'm not sure why they mention 2D to 3D in their message since probably all 3D tvs are doing that now.
Parsec
4.3 / 5 (12) Dec 26, 2011
It took many years to convert from black and white TV to color. I well remember that transition. In our town, there was only one station, and only a few shows actually filmed in color, all on Sunday night (for at least 2 years this was the case). We got our color TV in 1960, and there were still tons of BW TV's around in 1970.

3-D will be the only way people watch TV in a few years. It might take awhile, but I have no doubt it will happen.
BIG COCK
3.7 / 5 (13) Dec 26, 2011
No offense, but this article was terrible. There is no mention of how and why the technology is supposed to work other than the broad phrase "autostereoscopic 3-D imagery" which can refer to a variety of technologies. Of course I can just email the company and ask how it works, but that should be the job of the reporter!
Deesky
3 / 5 (11) Dec 26, 2011
3-D will be the only way people watch TV in a few years. It might take awhile, but I have no doubt it will happen.

I disagree. The demand for the current crop of 3D TVs is already waning. They produce annoying 'crosstalk' noise, have reduced resolution (usually halved) and reduced brightness compared to normal 2D TVs.

Then there's viewing fatigue (glasses or not) for a large section of viewers.

But converting 2D content into 3D is a flawed process as you're trying to add extra information when it doesn't exist in the original signal. Doing this manually (as for movies) can be somewhat successful, but doing it automatically on-the-fly is bound to be prone to large errors and weird effects.
bry_holder
4 / 5 (4) Dec 26, 2011
Yay! a step up from 15 year old technology!
lykitiz
4.3 / 5 (9) Dec 27, 2011
"I disagree. The demand for the current crop of 3D TVs is already waning. They produce annoying 'crosstalk' noise, have reduced resolution (usually halved) and reduced brightness compared to normal 2D TVs."

@Deesky Really? 3DTV sales were up 27% in Q3 vs. Q2 and are expected to be up another 30% in Q4. Sales of 3DTVs are now expected to hit 100 million by 2014. Hardly "waning demand".

As for 1/2 resolution? That is only if watching 3D in side-by-side format. Blu-ray and SENSIO 3D format are full HD.

Finally, brightness can EASILY be addressed by adjusting the brightness and/or contrast on the TV. Simple.
Staticblue
3.2 / 5 (6) Dec 27, 2011
My Nintendo 3DS already does this. 3D, adjustable depth, no glasses.
ShotmanMaslo
3.6 / 5 (8) Dec 27, 2011
I disagree. The demand for the current crop of 3D TVs is already waning. They produce annoying 'crosstalk' noise, have reduced resolution (usually halved) and reduced brightness compared to normal 2D TVs.


To clear this up: those televisions that use polarized glasses (LCD) have more crosstalk and halved resolution, but full brightness and no flickering. Televisions using shutter glasses (plasmas) have lower brightness and flickering, but full resolution and less crosstalk.

AWaB
3.5 / 5 (4) Dec 27, 2011
Another point that isn't made often in the 3D market is that the price of the larger TVs just dropped below $2000 this year. It's hard to compete with such high prices. The demand is increasing with the affordability of the product. I saw the Toshiba, I believe, ~50" TV with no glasses for $5k. When you can get that for $1500 they'll sell like hotcakes!
otheus
1.3 / 5 (12) Dec 27, 2011
Am I the first to say that no matter how good it is, 3D tech is just a stupid gimmick that gets old after the second viewing? We humans see in color, not black-and-white. We humans see in 2 dimensions, not 3. Our vision captures light onto a rounded, but otherwise flat, retina. So visually speaking, the 3rd dimension is already an illusion; "3D" only enhance that illusion. And for most of us adults, I boldly claim it's a gimmick that gets in the way of enjoying the film.
M 1
5 / 5 (12) Dec 27, 2011
We humans see in 2 dimensions, not 3.

Open your other eye.
sdf_iain
1.7 / 5 (6) Dec 27, 2011
While humans can see in 3D I've heard that we're lazy and generally perceive the world in 2D. Our brains only process images in 3D some small fraction of the time, hence 3D fatigue when we force them to do it for an entire movie.
Tweetie
4.5 / 5 (8) Dec 27, 2011
I have a 3D TV and I like it. It is obvious that some people posting on this thread have never seen a 3D TV or seen a 3D movie in a theater. I can't believe some posters are so dumb as to say humans only see in 2D. To the people complaining about having to wear glasses to see 3D, I hope you never need glasses or contacts to see in your everyday life. I have read some people posting some stupid things on internet threads but this thread takes the cake.
350
1.7 / 5 (3) Dec 27, 2011
@Tweetie you stole about half of what I was going to say lol.
CHollman82
3.6 / 5 (11) Dec 27, 2011
Am I the first to say that no matter how good it is, 3D tech is just a stupid gimmick that gets old after the second viewing? We humans see in color, not black-and-white. We humans see in 2 dimensions, not 3. Our vision captures light onto a rounded, but otherwise flat, retina. So visually speaking, the 3rd dimension is already an illusion; "3D" only enhance that illusion. And for most of us adults, I boldly claim it's a gimmick that gets in the way of enjoying the film.


Do you understand depth perception? We have two eyes, not one... two. Our two eyes give two different perspectives of the same scene that, when combined in our brain, provided information about depth, or distance of an object from the viewer. The closer the object is to the viewer greater the deviance of that object between the two perspectives. Your whole point flies out the window if you understand this simple fact.
that_guy
3 / 5 (2) Dec 27, 2011
This article sounds like a paid advertisement.

The 2D to 3D conversion is already available. I think upconverting is about as awesome as trying to take a B&W and make it color. It is only something that works well sometimes, and not without a lot of artistic endeavor. But on the fly? Pointless.

The 3D to 3D conversion is only mildly stupid. I will give them the benefit of the doubt and assume they mean that it can display multiple types of 3D signals - A break from the proprietery systems, where you need a sony 3D bluray with a sony 3D tv for example.

The IMPORTANT part SHOULD be the actual technology displaying the 3D, which in this case, sounds like they use the same parallax technology used in the 3DS.

Not really much to write home about. Just another product, but not the innovation or advance to justify the market.
that_guy
2.7 / 5 (3) Dec 27, 2011
Almost all 3D tech currently suffers from half brightness.

Because half the light is specifically directed only to one eye or the other. Or with lcd shutters, you only get light in one eye for half the time. They either have to be twice as bright, or they can also somewhat alleviate the issue through a complicated use of a fourth, yellow pixel.

All consumer 3D tech has half resolution.

Except the LCD shutter glasses, that re-use the full screen twice for each frame.

LCD shutters offer some substantial advantages over other technologies, but suck terribly in practice.

gollygosh
5 / 5 (1) Dec 27, 2011
Last years news in some ways - here's a video link showing it at last years show.
http://revision3....1-11ces1

I prefer this - http://www.heaven.../111.htm
meBigGuy
3.4 / 5 (5) Dec 28, 2011
hahaha --- some real laughs here. Way more than the usual. We only see in 2D? WOW. We can't see color then. Color television is just a gimmick. We only see intensity in 3 different color ranges, so color is just an illusion, a gimmick that gets in the way of good televsion. I boldly declare that color television is a passing fad, and we will soon be watching films in true black and white as they were meant to be seen.

Actually, the real trouble with 3D film is that the distant objects are in the same focal plane as the close ones, which stresses some people higher level visual processes and causes directors to make shorter scenes. Personally I find 3D entertaining, and think, when done well, its adds a subtle reality that slightly improves immersion. I doubt it will go away --- only become better and better, such as it is.
antialias_physorg
3.8 / 5 (5) Dec 28, 2011
Almost all 3D tech currently suffers from half brightness

I think 3D suffers from lack of content (but that already was a problem in 2D). Great for some things (medical, air traffic control, scientific simulations, gaming) - but for TV and movies it's currently a waste of time.
Vendicar_Decarian
1.8 / 5 (5) Dec 30, 2011
"My Nintendo 3DS already does this." - Static

And it works very poorly.
Vendicar_Decarian
1.7 / 5 (6) Dec 30, 2011
"Sounds Awesome!" - hydralics

There is a sucker born every minute.
_nigmatic10
3.7 / 5 (3) Dec 31, 2011
The technology is still a work in progress. Even the top of the line 3d tv's today have issues with the 3d movies. A lack of standardization over which technology, or rather which glasses to wear for the consumer.

I'd be more excited about the large display OLED's being developed. With extremely high refresh rates, flexible screens, and even sharper image technology, the age of the wrap around screen is not gone yet. In fact, with the proper transparency and multiple screens, i can see a true 3d experience coming.

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