Britain warns over state-sponsored cyber attacks

Nov 02, 2011
British Foreign Secretary William Hague speaks at the conclusion of the London Cyberspace Conference in London. Hague issued a warning on Wednesday to countries which sponsor cyber attacks, at the close of a global cyberspace conference in London.

British Foreign Secretary William Hague issued a warning on Wednesday to countries which sponsor cyber attacks, at the close of a global cyberspace conference in London.

He would not name and shame those responsible, saying the two-day talks were intended to be "constructive", but government advisor Pauline Neville-Jones said on Monday that Russia and China were "certainly some of them".

"State-sponsored attacks are not in the interests of any country long term, and those governments that perpetrate them need to bring them under control," Hague told delegates in his closing statement.

He told reporters later: "We have and we will have... in the future vigorous private discussions about this, particularly if our ability to detect and the source of them improves."

The conference, involving over 700 officials, security experts, and NGOs from more than 60 countries including Russia and China, failed to reach any formal agreement on the broad range of issues discussed.

But Hague said the talks made "important progress" towards setting out a global agenda, which will be followed up in conferences in Hungary in 2012 and South Korea in 2013.

Both Hague and , who addressed the meeting via videolink on Tuesday, had pressed the need for , and despite acknowledging a difference of opinion, Hague said most delegates agreed.

"There is a difference between British, American, European societies on the one hand and China, a different political system (with) different attitudes to freedom of expression offline as well as online," he told reporters.

But in his final statement he insisted: "There was overwhelming support for the principle that cyberspace must remain open to innovation and the of ideas, information and expression."

Hague said there was "no appetite" to develop new legally-binding treaties on the Internet, and said speakers had tended to back "a transparent and stable framework of self-regulation" rather than any government intervention.

However, most agreed that better global cooperation and collaboration was needed "to avoid misunderstandings", Hague said.

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User comments : 6

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kochevnik
2.3 / 5 (3) Nov 02, 2011
The M6 is in charge of false flag bombings like 7/7. Are they offering instructions on how to kill their own citizens as a false flag prelude to military escapades abroad? Will this become a university major, if not already?
Nerdyguy
1 / 5 (1) Nov 02, 2011
The M6 is in charge of false flag bombings like 7/7. Are they offering instructions on how to kill their own citizens as a false flag prelude to military escapades abroad? Will this become a university major, if not already?


Perhaps you might consider leaving this kind nonsense for the National Enquirer and its ilk? The article itself and the topics it presents, is fascinating enough without getting sidetracked into lunatic fringe conspiracy theories.
gmurphy
4 / 5 (4) Nov 02, 2011
And what about Stuxnet?, does that fall within the notion of 'state-sponsored cyber attacks' or is ok if it's the West against Iran. Don't get me wrong, Iran is little more than a totalitarian state but this sort of hypocrisy gets my goat.
Nerdyguy
1 / 5 (2) Nov 02, 2011
And what about Stuxnet?, does that fall within the notion of 'state-sponsored cyber attacks' or is ok if it's the West against Iran. Don't get me wrong, Iran is little more than a totalitarian state but this sort of hypocrisy gets my goat.


It is superbly fortunate that we have located an individual who can make the declaration that the U.S. developed Stuxnet from first-hand experience. What's that you say? You have no actual evidence and are merely casting aspersions? Oh, I see. Then kindly stick to the facts at hand and stop spreading garbage.
COCO
not rated yet Nov 03, 2011
Stuxnet was made where? Did it get to Japan and create that Fuku Flu?
Nerdyguy
1 / 5 (1) Nov 03, 2011
Stuxnet was made where? Did it get to Japan and create that Fuku Flu?


The source of origination of the Stuxnet virus is currently unknown. Unless you are high-level CIA, you are just guessing. And they may truly never figure it out.