BlackBerry woes caused by 'core switch failure'

October 11, 2011 By SYLVIA HUI , Associated Press
This file photo taken Sept. 8, 2011, shows a BlackBerry smartphone using the "Messenger" service, in Berlin. BlackBerry users were hit with service disruptions to their smartphones for a second day on Tuesday Oct. 11, 2011 after an unexplained glitch cut off Internet and messaging services for large numbers of users across Europe, the Middle East and Africa. (AP Photo/dapd, Oliver Lang, File) GERMANY OUT AUSTRIA OUT SWITZERLAND OUT

(AP) -- Email and messaging glitches that have plagued BlackBerry users around the world for a second day were caused by a core switch failure, the smartphone's maker said Tuesday.

Research in Motion Ltd. said the disruptions - which affected users from Europe to Latin America - were due to a failure within the company's own infrastructure. A transition to a back-up switch did not function as tested, causing a large backlog of data, RIM said.

It was the first time the company offered an explanation of the outage since problems first occurred Monday morning.

"We are now working to clear that backlog and restore normal service as quickly as possible," the company said in a brief statement.

The disruptions affected users in Europe, the Middle East and Africa, India, Brazil, Chile, and Argentina.

RIM said early Tuesday that the problems were resolved and that services were operating normally, but hours later it acknowledged that the disruptions were continuing.

RIM apologized for "any inconvenience," as Twitter and the Internet lit up with condemnation over a delayed response to problems some users had reported for hours.

In Britain, Vodafone UK told customers via Twitter that service was not fully restored. Rival T-Mobile UK blamed "a European-wide outage on the BlackBerry network" which it said was affecting all . There also were reports of problems elsewhere in Europe, such as Spain.

Etisalat, which operates in the , apologized for "the further interruption" to Blackberry services, "once again due to RIM problems."

Kenya's Safaricom Ltd. said on Twitter that its Blackberry customers were experiencing a "technical fault," while South Africa's Vodacom told subscribers the issues were affecting multiple networks and countries.

There were no reports of any problems in the U.S.

Angry smartphone users took to to vent frustration with the company and bemoaned the loss of their messaging capabilities, questioning why the company took so long to restore services.

Explore further: BlackBerry users dealing with e-mail outage

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Cave_Man
5 / 5 (1) Oct 12, 2011
It's just skynet don't worry the problem will be fixed soon when skynet nukes the civilized world and things will be running smoothly again. =P
COCO
not rated yet Oct 12, 2011
god willing
Temple
not rated yet Oct 12, 2011
That's particularly bad timing, what with all the buzz right now over the latest iPhone.

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