FAA probing News Corp.'s use of drones

Aug 08, 2011

(AP) -- With the newsgathering techniques of its sister publications in Britain under fire, News Corp. is facing a probe into the use of drones by its U.S.-based digital publication, The Daily.

Federal Administration Aviation spokeswoman Laura Brown says her agency is investigating whether The Daily's use of "unmanned aerial systems" violates FAA regulations.

Commercial operators typically need a certificate in order to fly the , especially in populated areas.

The Daily's blog shows it used drones to capture aerial footage of floodwaters in North Dakota and Mississippi in May and June.

The Daily spokeswoman Jenny Tartikoff said "we are not commenting on our newsgathering."

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User comments : 3

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unknownorgin
1 / 5 (1) Aug 09, 2011
FAA regulations are in conflict with the freedom of the press.
rwinners
5 / 5 (1) Aug 09, 2011
And all those 'anonmymous' pictures of famous boobs???

Clearly, from the results of English governmental investigations, the Murdock boys are above the law.
It's nice to have billions of dollars and own favors from lots of elected government officials, isn't it?
Ironically, the long term effects of the Murdocks (and others) will be to their own demise.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (2) Aug 09, 2011
FAA regulations are in conflict with the freedom of the press.
And my blog uses a team of jackbooted thugs to break down doors and beat the news out of people. I assume we are similarly protected.

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