Taiwan in stealth technology breakthrough: report

Jul 04, 2011
A warship sails in the ocean as part of a military maneuver. Taiwan has developed a radar-absorbent material in a breakthrough in the island's development of stealth technology, local media reported.

Taiwan has developed a radar-absorbent material in a breakthrough in the island's development of stealth technology, local media reported Monday.

Tests showed that a 50-tonne Seagull-class missile boat painted with the material was not spotted on a until it could be seen with the naked eye, the United Daily News said. It is the first time Taiwan has developed such material.

The navy declined to comment on the report.

It was not immediately clear if the material would be used in the navy's fleet of 10 locally manufactured 171-tonne missile boats, whose design is already intended to reduce radar detection.

The ships, which are armed with four Taiwan-made Hsiungfeng II (Brave Wind) ship-to-ship missiles, are intended to replace the aging Seagull-class boats, the navy said.

Tensions between Taiwan and its former rival China have reduced markedly since Ma Ying-jeou of the China-friendly Kuomintang party came to power in 2008 on promises of beefing up trade links and allowing in more Chinese tourists.

But Beijing still considers the island part of its territory awaiting reunification, by force if necessary even though Taiwan has governed itself since China's civil war ended in 1949, prompting Taiwan to continue modernising its armed forces.

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User comments : 4

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rwinners
not rated yet Jul 04, 2011
I seriously doubt that China has any real designs on Taiwan, protestations to the contrary aside.
It would be very foolish for China to destroy such an inportant trade partner
Now, just how thick and dense is this stuff they spray on ships?
Skepticus
not rated yet Jul 04, 2011
The material should be in the Chinese fatherland by now, and costs 10 cents a pound to produce...by prison labor!
sender
not rated yet Jul 04, 2011
Argon is dirt cheap some say.
jjoensuu
not rated yet Jul 05, 2011
I do not see China being interested of invading Taiwan either. China has been touting that two governments stuff for a while now and has a lot of their own investments in Taiwan (which would get messed in in the event of a war).

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