NATO plans force to respond to cyber attacks

Jun 08, 2011
NATO Defence ministers during a summit at the NATO headquarters in Brussels. NATO wants to beef up its cyber defence capabilities with the creation of a special task force to detect and respond to Internet attacks, an alliance expert said Wednesday at a conference on cyber security.

NATO wants to beef up its cyber defence capabilities with the creation of a special task force to detect and respond to Internet attacks, an alliance expert said Wednesday at a conference on cyber security here.

"NATO is planning to establish the Cyber Red Team (...) that would provide a significant contribution to the improvement of NATO's cyber defence capability," Luc Dandurand and expert with NATO's C3 Agency told delegates to the alliance's third annual cyber defence conference.

The new NATO cyber force could be involved in simulating threats and controlling readiness to response, gathering and using public information from open sources, scanning and probing networks as well as conducting against specific services or networks, according to Dandurand.

The Symantec firm recently reported that web-based attacks in 2010 were up 93 percent from 2009.

"The need for such a team is obvious," Dandurand said, adding it would primarily be tasked with detecting, responding to and assessing the "damage cyber attacks can cause in a military sense."

Dandurand also highlighted legal and privacy issues that must be addressed before NATO's can take shape.

"The two main issues identified at this point are the need to legitimize the Cyber Red Team activities that could otherwise be construed as the malicious or unauthorized use of computer systems, and the potential for invasion of privacy resulting from cyber red team activities," he told experts gathered at NATO's Tallinn-based Cyber Defence Centre.

"Cyber-attacks against Estonia in the Spring of 2007, during Russia's operation in Georgia in 2008, and the many more we have seen worldwide since then have shown us there is a new kind of war that can cause a lot of damage," Major General Jonathan Shaw, a British defence ministry official told delegates.

"We need a response system and we need to learn to respond fast. In the cyber world you have to do lot of homework before the attack in order to be effective," he added.

The three-day conference, which kicked off Tuesday and is attended by 300 international cyber experts, focuses on the legal and political aspects of national and global Internet security.

Explore further: Study: Social media users shy away from opinions

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NATO tackles cyber security at Tallinn meet

Jun 07, 2011

Three hundred global cyber experts gathered in Tallinn Tuesday for a NATO Cyber Conflict conference focused on the legal and political aspects of national and global Internet security amid a rise in attacks.

US urges NATO to build 'cyber shield'

Sep 15, 2010

NATO must build a "cyber shield" to protect the transatlantic alliance from any Internet threats to its military and economic infrastructures, a top US defence official said Wednesday.

NATO mobilises for cyber warfare

Nov 18, 2010

In 1989, before the Internet revolution, Suleyman Anil was the lone man in charge of the security of NATO's IT system, armed with a single computer.

NATO networks vulnerable to cyber threat: US

Jan 25, 2011

NATO's military networks are not fully protected against cyber threats and the alliance must make good on a pledge to erect a virtual wall by 2012, a top US defence official said Tuesday.

Recommended for you

WEF unveils 'crowdsourcing' push on how to run the Web

3 hours ago

The World Economic Forum unveiled a project on Thursday aimed at connecting governments, businesses, academia, technicians and civil society worldwide to brainstorm the best ways to govern the Internet.

Study: Social media users shy away from opinions

Aug 26, 2014

People on Facebook and Twitter say they are less likely to share their opinions on hot-button issues, even when they are offline, according to a surprising new survey by the Pew Research Center.

US warns shops to watch for customer data hacking

Aug 23, 2014

The US Department of Homeland Security on Friday warned businesses to watch for hackers targeting customer data with malicious computer code like that used against retail giant Target.

Fitbit to Schumer: We don't sell personal data

Aug 22, 2014

The maker of a popular line of wearable fitness-tracking devices says it has never sold personal data to advertisers, contrary to concerns raised by U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer.

Should you be worried about paid editors on Wikipedia?

Aug 22, 2014

Whether you trust it or ignore it, Wikipedia is one of the most popular websites in the world and accessed by millions of people every day. So would you trust it any more (or even less) if you knew people ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

TheGhostofOtto1923
4 / 5 (1) Jun 08, 2011
Maybe I'm naive or uninformed but couldn't this agency easily offer free antivirus software? They will be operating with our tax money and I assume they will need to be as familiar as norton et al with everyday threats.

So why do we still need to pay money to private firms with limited capability? These guys will not be just defensive in nature, but offer the potential to hunt and 'kill' dirtball hackers with more lasting results.