NASA aircraft to study air pollution

Jun 29, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- Two NASA research aircraft will fly over the Baltimore-Washington area of northeastern Maryland through July as part of a mission to enhance the measurement of ground-level air quality from space.

One of the aircraft, a 117-foot P-3B, will fly spiral profiles over six ground stations in Maryland throughout the month. These profiles will extend from 15,000 feet to as low as 1,000 feet from the ground. Between ground stations, flights will sample air along traffic corridors at low altitude.

Twelve to 14 are planned throughout the month. The P-3B, a four-engine turboprop, will carry a suite of nine instruments, while the two-engine UC-12 will carry two instruments.

Sampling will focus on an area extending from Beltsville, Md., in the southwest to the northeastern corner of Maryland in a pattern that follows major traffic corridors.

Explore further: Three Idaho quakes rattle residents from Washington to Montana

Related Stories

Paving the way for space-based air pollution sensors

Jun 24, 2011

Although the nation’s air has grown significantly cleaner in recent decades, about 40 percent of Americans – 127 million people – live in counties where pollution levels still regularly exceed ...

DARPA announces plans for self-piloted flying car

Apr 19, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Last week, DARPA announced that it is inviting proposals to tackle its latest project: "a vertical takeoff and landing roadable air vehicle." The ground-to-sky vehicle, called Transformer ...

Recommended for you

Image: Sentinel-1A satellite images Florida

19 hours ago

The peninsula sits between the Gulf of Mexico to the west, and the Atlantic Ocean to the east. The large body of water at the top of the image is the freshwater Lake Okeechobee. Covering about 1900 sq km, ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.