Google given more time to reach book settlement

Jun 01, 2011
The screen of a computer featuring a Google Book search. A US judge on Wednesday allowed Google and US authors and publishers more time to seek a new settlement over the Internet giant's plan to create a massive online library and bookstore.

A US judge on Wednesday allowed Google and US authors and publishers more time to seek a new settlement over the Internet giant's plan to create a massive online library and bookstore.

US Denny Chin gave and the and the Association of American Publishers (AAP) until July 19 to hammer out a deal to settle a 2005 class action charging Google with over its huge book-scanning project.

In March, Chin rejected a settlement calling for Google to pay $125 million to resolve outstanding copyright claims and to establish an independent "Book Rights Registry" which would provide sales and advertising revenue to authors and publishers.

Google said in a statement Wednesday that it has been "working closely with the authors and publishers to explore a number of options in response to the court's decision.

"At today's status hearing, we asked the court for more time to discuss those options," Google said. "Regardless of the outcome, we'll continue to make the world's books discoverable online through Google Books and Google eBooks."

Google's plan to scan and put online some 15 million books from more than 100 countries has come under heavy criticism in the United States. In France, three leading publishers have also sued Google for allegedly scanning thousands of books without permission.

Supporters of the settlement argued that Google's proposed digital library and e-bookstore would make millions of out-of-print books available and provide a new avenue for authors to profit from their works.

Opponents urged the judge to reject the deal on antitrust, copyright and privacy grounds and said it would give Google exclusive rights to digitize "orphan works" -- out-of-print books which remain under copyright but whose authors cannot be traced.

In his ruling, Chin said the proposed agreement was "not fair, adequate and reasonable" and would give Google "a significant advantage over competitors, rewarding it for engaging in wholesale copying of copyrighted works without permission."

Explore further: Net neutrality balancing act

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

US judge rejects deal for Google digital book plan

Mar 22, 2011

A US judge dealt a major setback on Tuesday to Google's plans for a vast digital library and online bookstore, rejecting a settlement hammered out by the Internet giant with authors and publishers.

Google book settlement facing antitrust scrutiny

Apr 29, 2009

Google's settlement with US authors and publishers over its book scanning project still needs the green light from a US judge but it may first have to pass muster with the US Justice Department.

Google books hearing set for February 18

Nov 20, 2009

A US judge set February 18 for a hearing on the revised legal settlement between Google and US authors and publishers that would allow the Internet giant to scan and sell millions of books online.

Recommended for you

White House updating online privacy policy

3 hours ago

A new Obama administration privacy policy out Friday explains how the government will gather the user data of online visitors to WhiteHouse.gov, mobile apps and social media sites. It also clarifies that ...

Net neutrality balancing act

22 hours ago

Researchers in Italy, writing in the International Journal of Technology, Policy and Management have demonstrated that net neutrality benefits content creator and consumers without compromising provider innovation nor pr ...

Twitter rules out Turkey office amid tax row

Apr 16, 2014

Social networking company Twitter on Wednesday rejected demands from the Turkish government to open an office there, following accusations of tax evasion and a two-week ban on the service.

How does false information spread online?

Apr 16, 2014

Last summer the World Economic Forum (WEF) invited its 1,500 council members to identify top trends facing the world, including what should be done about them. The WEF consists of 80 councils covering a wide range of issues including social media. Members come ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...

Venture investments jump to $9.5B in 1Q

Funding for U.S. startup companies soared 57 percent in the first quarter to a level not seen since 2001, as venture capitalists piled more money into an increasing number of deals, according to a report due out Friday.

Male monkey filmed caring for dying mate (w/ Video)

(Phys.org) —The incident was captured by Dr Bruna Bezerra and colleagues in the Atlantic Forest in the Northeast of Brazil.  Dr Bezerra is a Research Associate at the University of Bristol and a Professor ...

'Exotic' material is like a switch when super thin

(Phys.org) —Ever-shrinking electronic devices could get down to atomic dimensions with the help of transition metal oxides, a class of materials that seems to have it all: superconductivity, magnetoresistance ...