Image: Exploring the wonders of the universe

May 23, 2011
Image Credit: NASA

(PhysOrg.com) -- The newly-installed Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 is visible at center of the International Space Station's starboard truss.

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, or AMS, is the largest scientific collaboration to use the orbital laboratory.

This investigation is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and made possible by funding from 16 nations.

Led by Nobel Laureate Samuel Ting, more than 600 physicists from around the globe will be able to participate in the data generated from this particle physics detector.

The mission of the AMS is, in part, to seek answers to the mysteries of antimatter, and cosmic ray propagation in the universe.

Explore further: Space Station to Receive New Anti-Matter Detector Component

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