Japan develops mobile phone with human touch

Mar 03, 2011
Japan's Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International (ATR) researcher Takashi Minato displays a human-shaped mobile phone in Tokyo.The human-shaped mobile phone has a skin-like outer layer that enables users to feel closer to those on the other end.

Japanese researchers said Thursday they have developed a human-shaped mobile phone with a skin-like outer layer that enables users to feel closer to those on the other end.

"The may feel like the person you are talking to," the Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International (ATR) said in a press release, describing the gadget as a "revolutionary telecom medium".

The project is a collaboration between Osaka University, the mobile telephone operator and other institutes.

They hope to put it into commercial production within five years by adding image and functions.

The prototype, slightly bigger than the size of a palm, features an outer coating that feels like human skin, ATR officials said.

A speaker is installed in the head of the doll-like gadget and a light-emitting diode in its chest turns blue when the phone is in use and red when it is in standby mode.

The body resembles a human being but its design is so blurred that it could be taken as either male or female and young or old, the press release said.

Explore further: Neuroscientist's idea wins new-toy award

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User comments : 5

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plasticpower
not rated yet Mar 03, 2011
Dear god, that's hideous!
Honor
not rated yet Mar 03, 2011
wow weird.
jamesrm
5 / 5 (1) Mar 03, 2011
If I stick pins in it will the person on the other end feel it?
Could be a selling point (sic).

rgds
jms
EyeballBreather
5 / 5 (1) Mar 03, 2011
Ge'ez. Give it some hair, a pair of old navy jeans and a hipster retro t-shirt, puhlease!
JamesThomas
not rated yet Mar 04, 2011
Leave it to the Japanese to come-up with something like this.

I mean that respectfully...as they do often express an ummm, unusual type of creativity.

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