Judge allows Twitter in Conn. home invasion trial

Feb 22, 2011

(AP) -- A judge has rejected a request by a Connecticut man charged in a deadly home invasion to ban the use of Twitter during his trial.

New Haven Superior Court Jon Blue denied the motion Tuesday by attorneys for Joshua Komisarjevsky (koh-mih-sar-JEF'-skee).

Authorities say Komisarjevsky and Steven Hayes killed Jennifer Hawke-Petit and her daughters, 11-year-old Michaela and 17-year-old Hayley, in a 2007 home invasion. Hayes was sentenced to death last year.

Komisarjevsky's attorneys say that during Hayes' trial, sudden typing of by reporters and spectators signaled to the jury what evidence observers believed was significant.

Blue rejected a defense claim that a broadcasting ban in the case applies to Twitter. Blue said he still can ban if it becomes disruptive.

Jury selection for Komisarjevsky's trial starts March 14.

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