How to make graphene with a pencil and sticky tape (w/ Videos)

December 7, 2010 by Lisa Zyga weblog
Jonathon Hare holds a piece of tape with small pieces of graphite. Two-dimensional pieces of graphite are graphene. Image from video below.

(PhysOrg.com) -- In a video that communicates science achievements to people of all backgrounds, physicist and TV presenter Jonathan Hare explains how to make graphene from a graphite pencil and a piece of Scotch tape. The simple experiment shows how, in addition to being Nobel Prize-worthy material, graphene is also easily accessible for anyone with a scientific curiosity.

The was developed as an initiative of COST (European Collaboration for and Technology), an intergovernmental association promoting joint science research, with aid from The Vega Science Trust, a science video communication charity.

This past October, the 2010 Nobel Prize for Physics was awarded to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov from Manchester University for their work on .

The video on how to make graphene at home is one of two videos (both shown below) explaining the amazing properties of the material. Hare has previously appeared on the BBC program “Rough Science” and now runs the Creative Science Centre in Sussex.

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How to make graphene with a pencil and sticky tape with Dr. Jonathan Hare.
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Graphene and the carbon revolution with Dr. Jonathan Hare.

Explore further: Professor scoops top prize for 2D atomic crystals discovery

More information: via: IEEE Spectrum

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6 comments

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KwasniczJ
1 / 5 (2) Dec 07, 2010
Actually the largest monolayer of graphene, prepared with the above method was of area 0.25 mm2 - i.e. corresponding the size of dot in exclamation sign.
gwrede
1 / 5 (1) Dec 07, 2010
Nice video, except the guy kept alternating between whispering and shouting. This annoyed the heck out of me when I tried to listen to it with other people in the room. Volume down and you miss half of it, volume up, and you keep startling others.
Expiorer
2 / 5 (1) Dec 07, 2010
That must be a educational visit to kindergarden.
Is it?
Truth
not rated yet Dec 07, 2010
Nice video, except the guy kept alternating between whispering and shouting.
Actually, I've read about a medical condition concerning pulmonary function and the larynx, where the symptoms are just like this fellow's alternating voice volume. Don't remember the name of the condition, but it could explain his voice problem. Other than that, this is a very interesting video.
tkjtkj
not rated yet Dec 07, 2010
Nice video, except the guy kept alternating between whispering and shouting. This annoyed the heck out of me when I tried to listen to it with other people in the room. Volume down and you miss half of it, volume up, and you keep startling others.


Exactly! That audio quality prevented me from listening .. too much 'dynamic range' they'd say ...
Newbeak
5 / 5 (1) Dec 11, 2010
Nice video, except the guy kept alternating between whispering and shouting. This annoyed the heck out of me when I tried to listen to it with other people in the room. Volume down and you miss half of it, volume up, and you keep startling others.

I wholehearted agree-it is intensely annoying.Maybe its like stuttering,and he can't control himself.

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