Facebook voyeurism a part of workplace life: report

Oct 21, 2010
Facebook fans tend to lurk instead of play when they tune into the social network while at their jobs, according to a report released Thursday by computer security firm Palo Alto Networks.

Facebook fans tend to lurk instead of play when they tune into the social network while at their jobs, according to a report released Thursday by computer security firm Palo Alto Networks.

While many workers link to on company computers, 88 percent of the online traffic consists of people watching what friends are up to in the online community, the report found.

Use of social games such as "FarmVille" popular at Facebook accounted for only five percent of the traffic, while a meager 1.4 percent was devoted to posting updates or comments at the social network.

"The risks that voyeurism represent include a potential loss of and the possibility of malware introduction by clicking on a link within someone's 'wall,' " Palo Alto Networks said in the report.

"The small amount of (Facebook posts) should not minimize the risks in terms of what users are saying about work-related subjects such as current projects, travel plans and company status."

Managers of company face growing challenges in dealing with risks posed by Internet trends such as online communities or sharing music, game, photo or video files on peer-to-peer networks.

"IT teams are looking for ways to retain control within their organization at a time when non-IT-supported projects are pervasive," said Palo Alto Networks vice president of worldwide marketing René Bonvanie.

Explore further: Study: Social media users shy away from opinions

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