Bouncing water droplets reveal small-scale beauty (w/ Video)

Oct 14, 2010 by Lisa Zyga weblog
A clip of a bouncing water droplet from the video below. Credit: Aria and Gharib.

In the video below, scientists have captured the simple movements of water droplets on a superhydrophobic carbon nanotube surface. The video shows the water droplets as they bounce, slide, and roll across different structures made of the carbon nanotube arrays.

The scientists, Adrianus Aria and Morteza Gharib from the California Institute of Technology, used a high-speed camera at different frame rates to capture the .

The scientists controlled the exact size of the droplets with a syringe pump and released the droplets onto the surfaces using a flat-tipped needle. The droplets were illuminated from behind with a diffuse halogen light, demonstrating the artistic side of fluid dynamics.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.
Water droplets bounce on superhydrophobic carbon nanotube arrays. Credit: Aria and Gharib.


Explore further: Scientists unveil new technology to better understand small clusters of atoms

More information: via: "Bouncing Water Droplet on a Superhydrophobic Carbon Nanotube Array." Adrianus I. Aria and Morteza Gharib. arXiv:1010.1351v1

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Michael_Savory
not rated yet Oct 14, 2010
Watching something as simple as a water drop is apparently awesome at a couple thousand frames per second. I'll have to keep that in mind next time I'm in the shower.
PinkElephant
5 / 5 (1) Oct 14, 2010
Man, that last merging sequence was hot. Super sexy =)
Jimbaloid
not rated yet Oct 15, 2010
Watching something as simple as a water drop is apparently awesome at a couple thousand frames per second.


High speed cameras are 'the microscopes of time', they reveal detail of motion that would otherwise be too small and invisible to the naked eye and almost always it seems the result is both fascinating and beautiful!
Nyloc
not rated yet Oct 15, 2010
As I watched the drops cascade down the curved slope, their motion felt like the familiar fluid forces I've felt on a skateboard ramp. We are all bags of fluid and feel the same forces from our insides as we move. It kind of put things into a unique perspective to see the process at such a slow/small scale.