Coffee hit by global warming say growers

February 26, 2010
Coffee beans growing at a nursery in India. Coffee producers say they are getting hammered by global warming, with higher temperatures forcing growers to move to prized higher ground, putting the cash crop at risk.

Coffee producers say they are getting hammered by global warming, with higher temperatures forcing growers to move to prized higher ground, putting the cash crop at risk.

"There is already evidence of important changes" said Nestor Osorio, head of the International Coffee Organization (ICO), which represents 77 countries that export or import the beans.

"In the last 25 years the temperature has risen half a degree in coffee producing countries, five times more than in the 25 years before," he said.

Sipped by hundreds of millions of people worldwide, coffee is one of the globe's most important commodities, and a major mainstay of exports for countries from Brazil to Indonesia.

But producers meeting in Guatemala this week are in a state of panic over the impact of warming on their livelihoods.

While boutique roasters often seek out highland-grown cherries for their subtle tastes, the cooler terroir comes at a premium.

And the new race to the top comes amid already increasing demands for resources between farmers and energy firms.

"Land and water are being fought over by food and energy producers," said Osorio, "we need to make an assessment to guarantee the sustainability of and demand for coffee production."

ICO figures show that production in dipped last year, largely due to poor weather, and producers say they are struggling to stay afloat.

In Colombia, one of the world's largest producers, production slumped 30-35 percent while Costa Rica and El Salvador still struggled to recover from poor harvests in 2000-2005.

The National Association of Guatemala -- a regional leader -- said production in nine Latin American countries was expected to fall 28 percent in the first three months of this season.

Explore further: Coffee cultivation good for diversity in agrarian settlements but not in forests

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2 / 5 (4) Feb 27, 2010
I wonder if the AGW deniers will finally have a reality break when climate change keeps them from enjoying their coffee? It never ceases to amaze me how long people can deny whats happening right in front of their eyes, so maybe not.
not rated yet Feb 27, 2010
Coffee crops were poor this year due to cold snaps and rainfall.

This has what to do with the basis of the above article?
3 / 5 (2) Feb 27, 2010
"Coffee hit by global warming say growers"

Tell that to coffee growers in Parana, Br. where they lose most of their coffee plants every ca. 5 yrs due to frost. I think those Brasilians will be happy with a little warming.

These silly complaints are all based on whose ox is being gored.
1 / 5 (1) Feb 27, 2010
Conflating climate change with AGW? Take a break, take a breath, go to confession.

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