Swedish Internet firm to delete user data

April 27, 2009
Swedish telecom supplier Tele2 said it will delete information allowing their customers to be identified, a move police argue could make the hunt for Internet pirates "impossible."

Swedish telecom supplier Tele2 said Monday it will delete information allowing their customers to be identified, a move police argue could make the hunt for Internet pirates "impossible."

"We will erase the IP addresses after they have been used for our internal use, starting today," Niclas Palmstierna, Tele2's managing director for Sweden, told AFP.

An IP address is a unique number that is used to identify each sender or receiver of information that is sent across the Internet.

Sweden recently adopted a new law April 1, inspired by an EU directive on intellectual property, that allows authorities to request the identity of users suspected of downloading pirated material.

The move by Tele2 follows a similar policy introduced by Bahnof, a smaller Swedish Internet firm, that said it would not reveal users' IP addresses.

A high-ranking police official told the TT news agency that this could have a serious impact on their bid to crack down on Internet pirates.

"In certain cases, this will make an investigation impossible," said Stefan Kronkvist, the head of Swedish police's unit.

Tele2 is one of Sweden's main telecom providers and counts 600,000 people among its Internet clients.

Internet piracy has become a hotly-debated subject in the Scandinavian country since the four founders of the download site, The , were sentenced to a year in prison on April 17.

(c) 2009 AFP

Explore further: Nationwide IP trunking launched in Canada

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Interactive tool lifts veil on the cost of nuclear energy

August 24, 2015

Despite the ever-changing landscape of energy economics, subject to the influence of new technologies and geopolitics, a new tool promises to root discussions about the cost of nuclear energy in hard evidence rather than ...

Smart home heating and cooling

August 28, 2015

Smart temperature-control devices—such as thermostats that learn and adjust to pre-programmed temperatures—are poised to increase comfort and save energy in homes.

2 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

vivcollins
not rated yet Apr 27, 2009
because a business model is an ever evolving thing driven by customers, much to the annoyance of people who think it should not, because they can not.
nilbud
not rated yet Apr 27, 2009
Why are the pigs working for the music corporations as debt collectors. Surely the state pays their wages not the grasping fascists.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.