Toshiba to launch 43nm SLC NAND flash memory

October 28, 2008

Toshiba today announced the launch of a new line-up of 43nm single-level cell (SLC) NAND flash memory products available in densities ranging from 512Mbits to 64 gigabits (Gb) and in a total of 16 versions.

The new range includes three products, 16Gb, 32Gb and 64Gb, which integrate monolithic 16Gb chips fabricated with 43nm generation process technology, the highest density chips available. The new devices will start to come to market in the first quarter of 2009.

SLC chips can read and write large amounts of data at high speed, support a very large number of read and write times, and offer high-level reliability. Toshiba developed the new SLC devices to meet diversifying applications, and its enhanced line-up offers support for mobile phones, flat panel TVs, OA equipment, and servers, all of which require high levels of read and write speeds and reliability.

In recent years, Toshiba Corporation has promoted expansion of the NAND flash memory market by accelerating development of high density multi-level-cell (MLC) chips to be used for high capacity data storage in such markets as memory cards and MP3 players. Production of SLC chips has been limited, and with 56nm and 70nm process technologies. In bringing a wider range of SLC flash memories which suit to store data at an advanced level into its line-up, Toshiba aims to expand its line-up of high-value added products for diverse embedded applications, and will promote mass production through the application of advanced process technology.

Source: Toshiba

Explore further: Toshiba's New Memory Chips for Mobile Phones Support Both SLC and MLC Memory Areas

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