Toshiba Launches 256GB Solid State Drives with MLC

September 26, 2008

Toshiba today announced enhancements to its line-up of NAND-flash-based solid state drives (SSD) with the addition of an industry-leading 256-gigabyte (GB) SSD and the launch of a series of small-sized Flash Modules for netbook computers ultra-mobile PCs (UMPCs) and other mobile and peripheral applications. The new drives will be showcased at the CEATEC in Makuhari, Japan, from September 30 to October 4.

Samples of both the 256GB SSD and the Flash Modules are available now, and mass production following in the fourth quarter (October to December) of the year.

Toshiba’s new high density SSD brings 256GB of capacity, an original MLC controller that achieves higher read-write speeds, parallel data transfers and wear leveling to a 2.5-inch form factor drive. Alongside this, Toshiba provides support for the growing market for small, stripped down netbook computers and other personal equipment with the launch of Flash Modules, small SSDs supporting 8GB, 16GB, and 32GB densities.

The new 256GB SSD mounts NAND flash memory on a 70.6mm (L) x 53.6mm (W) x 3.0mm (H) platform. The drive offers performance characteristics essential for today’s mainstream notebook PCs: highly reliable, high density data storage and support for fast data transfer rates, with a maximum read speed of 120MB a second and maximum write speed of 70MB a second, via a high speed SATA 3.0Gb/s interface.

Flash Modules are fabricated on a 50mm x 30mm platform and offer a maximum read and write speeds of 80MB and 50MB a second, respectively. Flash Modules are also compatible with the SATA interface and will support continued development of the fast growing market for netbook PCs, UMPCs and mobile and peripheral applications by offering developers a wider range of SSD for integration in differentiated products.

Provided by Toshiba

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