Samsung Develops Fastest GDDR5 Memory at 6 Gb/s - World's Fastest Memory

Dec 05, 2007
Samsung Develops Fastest GDDR5 Memory at 6 Gb/s - World's Fastest Memory

Samsung Electronics announced today that it has developed the world's fastest memory, a GDDR5 (series five, graphics double-data-rate memory) chip that can transfer data at six gigabits per second, which is more than four times faster than that of memories in state-of-the-art game consoles today. Graphics memory is installed in desktop PCs, notebooks, workstations and game consoles to move huge volumes of video or animated images simultaneously.

Samsung's GDDR5, which will be introduced at a density of 512 Mbit (16Mb x 32) chips, is capable of transmitting moving images and associated data at 24 gigabytes per second.

"We're pushing image enhancement to a limit never before realized, enabling the smoothest, clearest animation that gamers have yet to experience," said Mueez Deen, Marketing Director, Graphics Memory, Samsung Semiconductor. "Samsung's 512Mb GDDR5 will enable the kind of graphics hardware performance that will spur software developers to deliver a new level of eye-popping games."

The new Samsung graphics memory operates at 1.5 volts, representing an approximate 20 percent improvement in power consumption over today's most popular graphics chip - the GDDR3.

Samples of Samsung's new GDDR5 chip have been delivered to major graphic processor companies last month and mass production is expected in the first half of 2007.

Samsung expects that GDDR5 memory chips will become the de facto standard in the top performing segment of the market by capturing more than 50 percent of the high-end PC graphics market by 2010.

A technical paper on Samsung's new 6Gbps graphics chip is the only one on GDDR5 technology to be selected for presentation at ISSCC 2008.

Source: Samsung

Explore further: Current tech boom is no dot-com bubble, experts say

Related Stories

Current tech boom is no dot-com bubble, experts say

3 hours ago

Silicon Valley's tech cup runneth over. Job growth is humming, coders are being lionized on HBO, Uber and its shared-economy cohorts are on fire, disrupted innovation is unfolding on every corner. And everyone from downtown ...

Producing jet fuel compounds from fungus

4 hours ago

Washington State University researchers have found a way to make jet fuel from a common black fungus found in decaying leaves, soil and rotting fruit. The researchers hope the process leads to economically ...

Recommended for you

Nikola Labs phone case harvests back wasted energy

9 minutes ago

If you click on the Nikola Labs site you will find an announcement that the group plans to go up on Kickstarter soon and they invite your email signup to learn more. Then at the bottom of the page is an ic ...

UW mapping app turns art into a sharable walking route

10 minutes ago

Creative athletes have been using geographic information systems to transform their running routes into kangaroos, robots and other works of art that they share online, and one romantic cyclist last year even spelled ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.