Air travelers offered way to ease guilt

March 2, 2007

A Virginia non-profit group is one of a number of groups benefiting from travelers who feel guilty about environmental damage caused by jetliners.

British Airways along with travel sites Travelocity and Expedia are giving purchasers a chance to buy an environmental offset when they get their airline ticket, USA Today reported Friday.

One of the beneficiaries of the offsets is The Conservation Fund, a non-profit with headquarters in Virginia that received the American Institute of Philanthropy's highest grade for accountability and performance. But not all organizations receiving the travel donations are like The Conservation Fund, the newspaper said.

Electrical engineer Ron Goltsch of West Caldwell, N.J. said he looked into one and found it was in business to make money, USA Today reported.

"I have a lot of doubts when some for-profit business needs my cash to save the world," said Goltsch.

Critics in the environmental movement told USA Today they worry that selling offsets may divert the public from supporting actions that would make a bigger difference, such as stricter laws.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Groups want review of Shell's Arctic regulatory filings

Related Stories

Groups want review of Shell's Arctic regulatory filings

April 28, 2015

Two groups petitioned the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday for an investigation of Royal Dutch Shell PLC and what the groups call misstatements in regulatory filings regarding the risk of a catastrophic oil ...

Amphibian chytrid fungus reaches Madagascar

February 26, 2015

The chytrid fungus, which is fatal to amphibians, has been detected in Madagascar for the first time. This means that the chytridiomycosis pandemic, which has been largely responsible for the decimation of the salamander, ...

Recommended for you

French teen finds 560,000 year-old tooth (Update)

July 28, 2015

A 16-year-old French volunteer archaeologist has found an adult tooth dating back around 560,000 years in southwestern France, in what researchers hailed as a "major discovery" Tuesday.

The couple who Facebooks together, stays together

July 27, 2015

Becoming "Facebook official" is a milestone in modern romance, and new research suggests that activities on the popular social networking site are connected to whether those relationships last.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.