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A moving story of FHL2 and forces

Researchers from the Mechanobiology Institute (MBI) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) have revealed the molecular events leading to the regulation of cell growth and proliferation in response to stiffness of the ...

dateOct 21, 2016 in Cell & Microbiology
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Ancient proteins shown to control plant growth

A UCLA-led international team of life scientists reports the discovery of mechanisms regulating plant growth that could provide new insights into how the mammalian biological clock affects human health. The research will ...

dateOct 20, 2016 in Biotechnology
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How snakes lost a blueprint for making limbs

Snakes lost their limbs over 100 million years ago, but scientists have struggled to identify the genetic changes involved. A Cell paper publishing October 20 sheds some light on the process, describing a stretch of DNA involved ...

dateOct 20, 2016 in Plants & Animals
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Amazonian frog has its own ant repellent

Special chemicals covering the skin of a tiny yellow-striped Amazonian frog provide a protective shield that wards off leaf-cutting ants allowing it to live comfortably among them. "It helps the frog blend in, because it ...

dateOct 20, 2016 in Plants & Animals
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Self-sorting cells disrupt development

In a developing embryo, some cells can self-segregate – like oil separating out of water – to help create the tissues and organs of the human body. For example, brain cells separate into clusters that give rise to different ...

How the African clawed frog got an extra pair of genes

The African clawed frog's ancestor inherited one set of chromosomes each from two different species and doubled its whole genome some 18 million years ago, according to an international research consortium led by Japanese ...

All yeasts are not created equal

Yeast. Great if you want to make bread or wine. Not so hot if it turns up as Candida albicans in large quantities in your body and makes you sick.

Unraveling the science behind biomass breakdown

Lignocellulosic biomass—plant matter such as cornstalks, straw, and woody plants—is a sustainable source for production of bio-based fuels and chemicals. However, the deconstruction of biomass is one of the most complex ...

Bacterial genes boost current in human cells

Duke University biomedical engineers have harvested genes for ion channels from bacteria that, with a few tweaks, can create and enhance electrical signaling in human cells, making the cells more electrically excitable.

Cassini sees dramatic seasonal changes on Titan
Scientists manipulate surfaces to make them invisible
Meet Savannasaurus, Australia's newest titanosaur

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