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Female birds call the shots in divorce

Research is shedding new light on the causes of divorce in monogamous year-round territorial birds. A Monash University study of the endangered Purple-crowned Fairy-wren has discovered the females are calling the shots when ...

dateJul 20, 2016 in Plants & Animals
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Parrots know shapes

When he looks at a Kanizsa triangle, the famous optical illusion made up of three Pac-Man figures facing each other, Griffin doesn't just see three figures converging on each other. He sees a triangle.

dateJul 20, 2016 in Plants & Animals
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Scientists watch water fleas take over new territory

Look into any nutrient-rich pond almost anywhere in the world and you will find Daphnia pulex, a tiny crustacean (also called a water flea) that is a source of food for fish and fascination for scientists. A new study, reported ...

dateJul 19, 2016 in Ecology
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Researchers discover real reason why turtles have shells

It is common knowledge that the modern turtle shell is largely used for protection. No other living vertebrate has so drastically altered its body to form such an impenetrable protective structure as the turtle. However, ...

Economist suggests humans are still evolving

(Phys.org)—Harvard economist Jonathan Beauchamp has conducted a study of lifetime reproductive success (rLRS) of a small segment of the U.S. population and has concluded that there is evidence that humans are still evolving. ...

Sex in the city: Peregrine falcons in Chicago don't cheat

Peregrine Falcons, in their normal habitat on isolated cliffs, mate for life. But some 25 pairs now nest on Chicago skyscrapers and bridges, and city living has them in much closer quarters than they used before humans dominated ...

Solving a plant-based Rubik's cube puzzle

Scientists at the John Innes Centre have discovered a key "twist" in a Rubik's cube-like plant puzzle, which could pave the way to new, or more effective pharmaceuticals.

Key to regulating cell's powerhouse discovered

Aging, neurodegenerative disorders and metabolic disease are all linked to mitochondria, structures within our cells that generate chemical energy and maintain their own DNA. In a fundamental discovery with far-reaching implications, ...

Zoologist bemoans the continuing loss of butterfly species

(Phys.org)—Jeremy Thomas, a zoologist with the University of Oxford, has written a Perspective piece for the journal Science offering an overview of the declining numbers of butterfly species around the globe and the reasons ...

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Warmer Mediterranean turns the Sahel green

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