Fungal spores harness physics to launch themselves

Researchers from Duke University have uncovered the detailed mechanics of the way fungal spores have evolved to harness the power of merging water droplets to launch in a uniform manner.

The dynamic surface tension of water

The surface tension of a liquid is a measure of the cohesive forces that hold the molecules together. It is responsible for a water drop assuming a spherical shape and for the effects of surfactants to produce bubbles and ...

How water droplets freeze: The physics of ice and snow

Freezing water is a central issue for climate, geology and life. On earth, ice and snow cover 10 percent of the land and up to half of the northern hemisphere in winter. Polar ice caps reflect up to 90 percent of the sun's ...

Collaborative unmanned systems extinguish fire in demonstration

Lockheed Martin demonstrated its ability to integrate unmanned aircraft system (UAS) operations into the National Airspace System (NAS) using its prototype UAS Traffic Management (UTM) capabilities. During the demonstration ...

Scientists use holography to peer into clouds

Watching clouds go by, swirls of white puff up and melt away. The changes mirror mixing within the clouds as drier air mingles with water-saturated air.

An air cushion for falling droplets

Falling droplets bounce as many as fifteen times before they come to rest on a flat surface. In the past, it was believed that this phenomenon is limited to water drops on superhydrophobic surfaces.

Exotic shapes for liquid drops have many applications

(Phys.org) —Oil and water don't mix, as any chemist or cook knows. Tom Russell, a polymer scientist from the University of Massachusetts who now holds a Visiting Faculty appointment with Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences ...

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