Related topics: climate change · ocean

Small 'snowflakes' in the sea play a big role

In the deep waters that underlie the productive zones of the ocean, there is a constant rain of organic material called "marine snow." Marine snow does not only look like real snow but also behaves similarly: Large flakes ...

Global evapotranspiration rose by 10% from 2003 to 2019

A team of researchers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology has found that global evapotranspiration rose by 10% from 2003 to 2019. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the ...

Carbon emissions from dams considerably underestimated so far

Among other things, dams serve as reservoirs for drinking water, agricultural irrigation, or the operation of hydropower plants. Until now, it had been assumed that dams act as net carbon stores. Researchers from the Helmholtz ...

Corals go hungry long before they bleach

The results of coral beaching are obvious—stark underwater forests of white coral skeletons—yet the physiological processes of bleaching are not well understood. Now, KAUST researchers show that, long before signs of ...

Streams and rivers emit more carbon dioxide at night than day

Streams and rivers emit large amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, but a new study published in Nature Geoscience led by researchers at the universities in Umeå and Lausanne shows that the flux may be greater than ...

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Water cycle

The water cycle, also known as the hydrologic cycle, describes the continuous movement of water on, above, and below the surface of the Earth. Since the water cycle is truly a "cycle," there is no beginning or end. Water can change states among liquid, vapor, and ice at various places in the water cycle. Although the balance of water on Earth remains fairly constant over time, individual water molecules can come and go.

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