Related topics: clinical trials · eye · retina

For night vision, snakes see a clear choice

San Diego State University doctoral student Hannes Schraft wanted to learn whether rattlesnakes find their way around at night with their eyes alone, or get an assist from the same thermal-sensing abilities they use to hunt ...

Novel system mimics focus activity of the human eye

With aging comes deteriorating vision. At SIGGRAPH 2018, attendees will have the chance to test a new computational system that effectively mimics the natural way the human eye corrects focus, specifically while viewing objects ...

Details that look sharp to people may be blurry to their pets

Compared with many animals, human eyes aren't particularly adept at distinguishing colors or seeing in dim light. But by one measure at least—something called visual acuity—human eyes can see fine details that most animals ...

Starfish on ocean floor found to have well developed eyes

A team of researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the Greenland Institute of Natural Resources has found that starfish living in the dark on the ocean floor have eyes on their arms that are similar to other starfish ...

Honey bees have sharper eyesight than we thought

Research conducted at the University of Adelaide has discovered that bees have much better vision than was previously known, offering new insights into the lives of honey bees, and new opportunities for translating this knowledge ...

Small birds' vision: Not so sharp but superfast

One may expect a creature that darts around its habitat to be capable of perceiving rapid changes as well. Yet birds are famed more for their good visual acuity. Joint research by Uppsala University, Stockholm University ...

Age doesn't matter for foraging albatrosses

A new study of the wandering albatrosses breeding on the sub-antarctic island of Bird Island (off South Georgia) reveals that age doesn't matter when foraging. The research, published in the journal PLOS ONE last month, shows ...

Archerfish get an eye test (w/ video)

(Phys.org) —A modified version of an eye test used to assess visual acuity in the military has been given to archerfish by scientists to help explain how these remarkable fish are able to accurately spit down tiny insects ...

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