New technique grows tiny 'hairy' materials at the microscale

(Phys.org) —Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory attacked a tangled problem by developing a new technique to grow tiny "hairy" materials that assemble themselves at the microscale.

Graphene 'onion rings' have delicious potential

Concentric hexagons of graphene grown in a furnace at Rice University represent the first time anyone has synthesized graphene nanoribbons on metal from the bottom up—atom by atom.

Scientists develop cheaper, more efficient fuel cells

(Phys.org) —Using the Canadian Light Source (CLS) synchrotron, researchers have discovered a way to create cheaper fuel cells by dividing normally expensive platinum metal into nanoparticles (or even single atoms) for use ...

Pottery reveals Ice Age hunter-gatherers' taste for fish

Hunter-gatherers living in glacial conditions produced pots for cooking fish, according to the findings of a pioneering new study led by the University of York which reports the earliest direct evidence for the use of ceramic ...

Routes towards defect-free graphene

A new way of growing graphene without the defects that weaken it and prevent electrons from flowing freely within it could open the way to large-scale manufacturing of graphene-based devices with applications in fields such ...

New sensor detects bombs on sea floor

The CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) has developed a sensor to detect undetonated explosives on the sea floor. It is based on technology used to find mineral deposits underground.

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