Embryos remember the chemicals that they encounter

We all start out as a clump of identical cells. As these cells divide and multiply, they gradually take on distinct identities, acquiring the traits necessary to form, for instance, muscle tissue, bone, or nerves. A recent ...

Researchers advance stem cell therapy with biodegradable scaffold

Rutgers scientists have created a tiny, biodegradable scaffold to transplant stem cells and deliver drugs, which may help treat Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, aging brain degeneration, spinal cord injuries and traumatic ...

How sleeping mammary stem cells are awakened in puberty

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have discovered how the growth of milk-producing mammary glands is triggered during puberty.Sleeping stem cells in the mammary gland are awoken by a protein dubbed FoxP1, according ...

Regulating gene transcription using light

Researchers led by Mustafa Khammash have developed a new method that uses blue light to control the transcription of DNA into RNA in single cells. The technology could also be used in tissue engineering and stem cell research.

How to make fish shine

Scientists from the University of Bath have helped to figure out why shoals of fish flash silver as they twist through the water by studying how the shiny silver cells are created in zebrafish.

Scientists mimic the earliest stages of human development

Human embryos start as a tiny mass of cells that are all the same. The first step in growing from a homogenous ball of cells into a complex individual with distinct organs and tissues is for the cells to divide into distinct ...

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