Simulating Red Sea water exchanges

Powerful computer simulations are revealing new insights into water exchanges between the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden.

Climate change enhances carbon dioxide flux from lakes

Boreal lakes play a significant role in global carbon cycling. Small and shallow lakes are abundant in northern areas, and they are often biologically active because of the loading of organic matter from the catchments. As ...

Supercomputing dynamic earthquake rupture models

Some of the world's most powerful earthquakes involve multiple faults, and scientists are using supercomputers to better predict their behavior. Multi-fault earthquakes can span fault systems of tens to hundreds of kilometers, ...

Melting small glaciers could add 10 inches to sea levels

A new review of glacier research data paints a picture of a future planet with a lot less ice and a lot more water. Glaciers worldwide are projected to lose anywhere from 18% to 36% of their mass by 2100, resulting in almost ...

A quantum leap in particle simulation

A group of scientists at the Department of Energy's Fermilab has figured out how to use quantum computing to simulate the fundamental interactions that hold together our universe.

Formation of honeycomb nanostructures finally explained

A few years ago, a promising new type of nanomaterial was observed experimentally, combining the virtues of semiconductors with those of graphene. The material is formed by nanocrystals that spontaneously assemble into a ...

Lasers make magnets behave like fluids

For years, researchers have pursued a strange phenomenon: When you hit an ultra-thin magnet with a laser, it suddenly de-magnetizes. Imagine the magnet on your refrigerator falling off.

Using artificial intelligence to understand collective behavior

Professor Thomas Müller and Professor Hans Briegel have been carrying out research on a machine learning model for several years that differs significantly from alternative artificial intelligence (AI) learning models. The ...

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Simulation & Modeling for Acquisition, Requirements, and Trainin

Simulation is the imitation of some real thing, state of affairs, or process. The act of simulating something generally entails representing certain key characteristics or behaviours of a selected physical or abstract system.

Simulation is used in many contexts, including the modeling of natural systems or human systems in order to gain insight into their functioning. Other contexts include simulation of technology for performance optimization, safety engineering, testing, training and education. Simulation can be used to show the eventual real effects of alternative conditions and courses of action.

Key issues in simulation include acquisition of valid source information about the relevent selection of key characteristics and behaviours, the use of simplifying approximations and assumptions within the simulation, and fidelity and validity of the simulation outcomes.

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