Radio-frequency wave scattering improves fusion simulations

In the quest for fusion energy, understanding how radio-frequency (RF) waves travel (or "propagate") in the turbulent interior of a fusion furnace is crucial to maintaining an efficient, continuously operating power plant. ...

Mapping the 'superhighways' travelled by the first Australians

'Superhighways' used by a population of up to 6.5 million Indigenous Australians to navigate the continent tens of thousands of years ago have been revealed by new research using sophisticated modelling of past people and ...

Natural variations help resolve a climate puzzle

New research shows that naturally occurring climate variations help to explain a long-standing difference between climate models and satellite observations of global warming.

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Simulation & Modeling for Acquisition, Requirements, and Trainin

Simulation is the imitation of some real thing, state of affairs, or process. The act of simulating something generally entails representing certain key characteristics or behaviours of a selected physical or abstract system.

Simulation is used in many contexts, including the modeling of natural systems or human systems in order to gain insight into their functioning. Other contexts include simulation of technology for performance optimization, safety engineering, testing, training and education. Simulation can be used to show the eventual real effects of alternative conditions and courses of action.

Key issues in simulation include acquisition of valid source information about the relevent selection of key characteristics and behaviours, the use of simplifying approximations and assumptions within the simulation, and fidelity and validity of the simulation outcomes.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA