Related topics: cells · protein · brain · molecules · nerve cells

From cone snail venom to pain relief

Conotoxins are bioactive peptides found in the venom that marine cone snails produce for prey capture and defense. They are used as pharmacological tools to study pain signalling and have the potential to become a new class ...

Synthetic compound provides fast screening for potential drugs

A simple assay may benefit drug discovery for treating diabetes, Parkinson's, and Alzheimers disease, as well as studies of functional food and endocrine disruptor report researchers at Okayama University in the Journal of ...

Researchers find new signaling systems in human cells

One-third of all approved drugs target the same family of receptors: the G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Now, researchers from the University of Copenhagen, along with two American labs, have expanded the known network ...

Sensing sweetness on a molecular level

Whether it's chocolate cake or pasta sauce, the sensation of sweetness plays a major role in the human diet and the perception of other flavors. While a lot is known about the individual proteins that signal "sweet," not ...

SciLifeLab and AstraZeneca use cryo-EM to advance biomedicine

A study published in Science Advances reveals the mechanism by which the receptor tyrosine kinase RET can increase neuronal survival in degenerative diseases. To understand the mechanism of this signalling complex, the study ...

How roots grow hair

The roots of plants can do a lot of things: They grow in length to reach water, they can bend to circumvent stones, and they form fine root hairs enabling them to absorb more nutrients from the soil. A team of researchers ...

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Receptor (biochemistry)

In biochemistry, a receptor is a protein molecule, embedded in either the plasma membrane or cytoplasm of a cell, to which a mobile signaling (or "signal") molecule may attach. A molecule which binds to a receptor is called a "ligand," and may be a peptide (such as a neurotransmitter), a hormone, a pharmaceutical drug, or a toxin, and when such binding occurs, the receptor undergoes a conformational change which ordinarily initiates a cellular response. However, some ligands merely block receptors without inducing any response (e.g. antagonists). Ligand-induced changes in receptors result in physiological changes which constitute the biological activity of the ligands.

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