Related topics: cells · genes · cancer · cancer cells · amino acids

New method to create ultrafast 3-D images of nanostructures

Lensless microscopy with X-rays, or coherent diffractive imaging, is a promising approach. It allows researchers to analyse complex three-dimensional structures, which frequently exist in nature, from a dynamic perspective. ...

Turning silenced cancer genes back into fighters

Working with human colon cancer cells and mice, researchers led by experts at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have successfully blocked the activity of portions of a protein known as UHRF1 and restored the ...

The sticky science of underwater adhesives

Mussels stick to rocks on the seafloor, to aquatic plants, and—to the consternation of boaters—they can hitch rides fastened to seafaring vessels no matter their composition: metals, rubber, glass, wood and more.

Multiple modes for selectivity of transmembrane transport

LMU researchers utilized a biophysical approach to understand how bacterial import proteins bind and selectively convey their cargoes across membranes. The results reveal an unexpectedly wide variety of transfer mechanisms.

Can we cure cancer by finding out how two proteins interact?

In a paper published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Dr. Özdemir has studied two protein families named Rho GTPases and IQGAPs, which are known to play an important role in cancer metastasis. These two "suspicious" ...

Turning an old enemy into a helpful friend

Half our genome is basically foreign, derived from viruses. Obviously, the invasion of such foreign elements can deregulate critical biological processes, and lead to disease. This is why animals, including humans have evolved ...

The arrestin-GPCR connection

G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the "inbox" of environmental messages in mammalian cells. Because of their central role in signaling pathways, mutations resulting in abnormal GPCR functions cause a wide variety of ...

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