Related topics: species · invasive species

Rare California trout species returns to native habitat

For the first time in nearly a century, a rare California trout species will swim in a mountain creek that is its native habitat, marking a major milestone that conservationists hope will lead to a thriving population and ...

Public support for gene drives in agriculture tied to limits

The first national survey inquiring about American attitudes toward agricultural gene drives—genetic modification techniques that can be used to "drive" a genetic trait or characteristic through a given insect pest population ...

DNA tests of UK waters could help catch invasive species early

A team of scientists from the University of Southampton, Bangor University and the National Oceanography Centre have discovered several artificially introduced species in the coastal waters of southern England, using a technique ...

When invasive plants take root, native animals pay the price

Imagine a new breed of pirate not only able to sail the high seas, but to exploit nearly any mode of transportation without detection. And these raiders' ambitions have little to do with amassing treasure and everything to ...

Removing tiny shrimp may help climate-proof Lake Tahoe's clarity

Lake Tahoe, with its iconic blue waters straddling the borders of Nevada and California, continues to face a litany of threats related to climate change. But a promising new project to remove tiny, invasive shrimp could be ...

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Indigenous (ecology)

In biogeography, a species is defined as indigenous or native to a given region or ecosystem if its presence in that region is the result of only natural resources, with no human intervention. Every natural organism (as opposed to a domesticated organism) has its own natural range of distribution in which it is regarded as native. Outside this native range, a species may be introduced by human activity; it is then referred to as an introduced species within the regions where it was anthropogenically introduced.

An indigenous species is not necessarily endemic. In biology and ecology, endemic means exclusively native to the biota of a specific place. An indigenous species may occur in more than one locale.

The terms endemic and indigenous do not imply that an organism necessarily originated or evolved where it is found.

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