Related topics: species ยท invasive species

Researchers sequence myrtle rust genome

The invasive fungus myrtle rust has been attacking native plants, driving some to the brink of extinction. Dr Peri Tobias and her team hope that sequencing the entire genome can help the plants fight back.

On the brink: Brazil's coastal rainforest

Together with Brazilian colleagues, Senckenberg scientist Raffael Ernst investigated the impact of current land use on the bird and amphibian fauna of the Atlantic rainforest in southeastern Brazil. In their study, published ...

The buzz about pollinators in canola fields

Farmers pay attention to many aspects of their crops. They carefully track how much water they are giving them and the amount of fertilizer they are using. But what about how many bees and butterflies are visiting?

Introduced honeybee may pose threat to native bees

A Curtin University study has found the introduced European honeybee could lead to native bee population decline or extinction when colonies compete for the same nectar and pollen sources in urban gardens and areas of bush.

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Indigenous (ecology)

In biogeography, a species is defined as indigenous or native to a given region or ecosystem if its presence in that region is the result of only natural resources, with no human intervention. Every natural organism (as opposed to a domesticated organism) has its own natural range of distribution in which it is regarded as native. Outside this native range, a species may be introduced by human activity; it is then referred to as an introduced species within the regions where it was anthropogenically introduced.

An indigenous species is not necessarily endemic. In biology and ecology, endemic means exclusively native to the biota of a specific place. An indigenous species may occur in more than one locale.

The terms endemic and indigenous do not imply that an organism necessarily originated or evolved where it is found.

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