Related topics: cells

Ring-shaped multi-carbon compound cyclocarbon synthesized

A team of researchers from Oxford University and IBM Research has for the first time successfully synthesized the ring-shaped multi-carbon compound cyclocarbon. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes ...

Through the kidneys to the exit

Scientists at the National University of Science and Technology "MISIS" (NUST MISIS) have identified a new mechanism for removing magnetic nanoparticles through the kidneys, which will help to create more effective and safe ...

How do atoms vibrate in graphene nanostructures?

In order to understand advanced materials like graphene nanostructures and optimize them for devices in nano-, opto- and quantum-technology it is crucial to understand how phonons—the vibration of atoms in solids—influence ...

An emerging view of RNA transcription and splicing

Cells often create compartments to control important biological functions. The nucleus is a prime example; surrounded by a membrane, it houses the genome. Yet cells also harbor enclosures that are not membrane-bound and more ...

New software brings lower-resolution cryo-EM maps into focus

Cryo-electron microscopy is now the most popular method for determining protein structures, which helps researchers develop drugs for different kinds of ailments. Over the last several decades, it has replaced X-ray crystallography ...

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Microscopy

Microscopy is the technical field of using microscopes to view samples or objects. There are three well-known branches of microscopy, optical, electron and scanning probe microscopy.

Optical and electron microscopy involve the diffraction, reflection, or refraction of electromagnetic radiation/electron beam interacting with the subject of study, and the subsequent collection of this scattered radiation in order to build up an image. This process may be carried out by wide-field irradiation of the sample (for example standard light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy) or by scanning of a fine beam over the sample (for example confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy). Scanning probe microscopy involves the interaction of a scanning probe with the surface or object of interest. The development of microscopy revolutionized biology and remains an essential tool in that science, along with many others including materials science and numerous engineering disciplines.

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