Related topics: cells · cell membrane

An easier way of sneaking antibodies into cells

For almost any conceivable protein, corresponding antibodies can be developed to block it from binding or changing shape, which ultimately prevents it from carrying out its normal function. As such, scientists have looked ...

Dynamic images show rhomboid protease in action

Rhomboid proteases are clinically relevant membrane proteins that play a key role in various diseases. Using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, researchers from Berlin's Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie ...

Growth Arrest Specific 7 protein allows cells to eat

Without hands or feet, a single human cell has little to protect itself from surrounding threats like bacteria or viruses. In this way, the cell membrane has evolved to be much more than a wall that keeps cell content inside ...

New findings on the recycling centres of cells

Both animal and plant cells depend on autophagy in which damaged or superfluous cell material is removed. The degradation of substrates is done by proteins. In animals, it takes place in a cell organelle called the lysosome ...

Waste plastic converted into filtration membranes

In a world that seems to be drowning in plastic bottles, recycling this waste into useful materials would help to reduce its environmental impact. KAUST researchers have now invented a way to turn plastic bottles into porous ...

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Membrane

A membrane is a layer of material which serves as a selective barrier between two phases and remains impermeable to specific particles, molecules, or substances when exposed to the action of a driving force. Some components are allowed passage by the membrane into a permeate stream, whereas others are retained by it and accumulate in the retentate stream.

Membranes can be of various thickness, with homogeneous or heterogeneous structure. Membrane can also be classified according to their pore diameter. According to IUPAC, there are three different types of pore size classifications: microporous (dp < 2nm), mesoporous (2nm < dp < 50nm) and macroporous (dp > 50nm). Membranes can be neutral or charged, and particles transport can be active or passive. The latter can be facilitated by pressure, concentration, chemical or electrical gradients of the membrane process. Membranes can be generally classified into three groups: inorganic, polymeric or biological membranes. These three types of membranes differ significantly in their structure and functionality.

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