Related topics: protein ยท cell membrane

Decontaminating heavy metal water using protein from plant waste

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), in collaboration with ETH Zurich, Switzerland (ETHZ), have created a membrane made from a waste by-product of vegetable oil manufacturing that can ...

Light-induced changes in shape power a pump in a marine bacterium

RIKEN biochemists have discovered how a miniscule pump in a marine microbe shuttles negative ions into the cell by changing shape when activated by light. As well as providing insights into how these ion pumps work, the findings ...

Human membrane proteins strike evolutionary balance

Cells are compartmentalized by membranes, and proteins present in these membranes play an important role in transporting cellular information. For proper function of these proteins to occur, a tertiary protein structure must ...

Simulations predict mysterious biological processes of the cell

The research group of Lucie Delemotte, Associate Professor in computational biophysics at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden, is focusing on understanding the function of ion channels in cell membranes. ...

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Membrane protein

A membrane protein is a protein molecule that is attached to, or associated with the membrane of a cell or an organelle. More than half of all proteins interact with membranes.

Biological membranes consist of a phospholipid bilayer and a variety of proteins that accomplish vital biological functions. Structural proteins are attached to microfilaments in the cytoskeleton which ensures stability of the cell. Cell recognition proteins allow cells to identify each other and interact. Such proteins are involved in immune response, for example. Membrane enzymes produce a variety of substances essential for cell function. Membrane receptor proteins serve as connection between the cell's internal and external environments. Finally, transport proteins play an important role in the maintenance of concentrations of ions. These transport proteins come in two forms: carrier proteins and channel proteins. Carrier proteins are involved in using the energy released from ATP being broken down to facilitate active transport and ion exchange. These processes ensure that useful substances are able to enter the cell and that toxic substances are pumped out of the cell.

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