Related topics: mass spectrometry · protein

Researchers detect bromine atoms in springtime Arctic

For the first time, researchers at the University of Michigan have detected bromine atoms in the atmosphere, and in doing so, have confirmed the reaction pathway through which mercury is removed from the atmosphere and enters ...

Artificial intelligence boosts proteome research

Using artificial intelligence, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have succeeded in making the mass analysis of proteins from any organism significantly faster than before and almost error-free. This ...

Agrochemists find proof of the ferrous wheel hypothesis

A team of agrochemists from Russia, Germany, and Chile confirmed the so-called ferrous wheel hypothesis—the turnover of iron in the soil that enriches it with organic nitrogen. The results of the study were published in ...

Nanopores make portable mass spectrometer for peptides a reality

University of Groningen scientists have developed nanopores to directly measure the mass of peptides. Although the resolution needs improvement, this proof of principle shows that a cheap and portable peptide mass spectrometer ...

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Mass spectrometry

Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique for the determination of the elemental composition of a sample or molecule. It is also used for elucidating the chemical structures of molecules, such as peptides and other chemical compounds. The MS principle consists of ionizing chemical compounds to generate charged molecules or molecule fragments and measurement of their mass-to-charge ratios. In a typical MS procedure:

MS instruments consist of three modules: an ion source, which can convert gas phase sample molecules into ions (or, in the case of electrospray ionization, move ions that exist in solution into the gas phase); a mass analyzer, which sorts the ions by their masses by applying electromagnetic fields; and a detector, which measures the value of an indicator quantity and thus provides data for calculating the abundances of each ion present. The technique has both qualitative and quantitative uses. These include identifying unknown compounds, determining the isotopic composition of elements in a molecule, and determining the structure of a compound by observing its fragmentation. Other uses include quantifying the amount of a compound in a sample or studying the fundamentals of gas phase ion chemistry (the chemistry of ions and neutrals in a vacuum). MS is now in very common use in analytical laboratories that study physical, chemical, or biological properties of a great variety of compounds.

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