Liquid metal ink liberates form

Today's electronic devices strive for new form factors—to make them foldable, stretchable, and deformable. To produce such devices that are highly stretchable or deformable, it is necessary to develop electrodes and circuit ...

Making mechanical skin

Soft, stretchable materials that are also electrically conductive are hard to come by. It's even harder to create a circuit that withstands damage, going as far as to heal itself. For Carnegie Mellon University researchers, ...

The surprising strength of liquid crystals

Dendrites are the destructive by-products of the cycle of charging and discharging lithium ion batteries. These tiny deposits form between the battery's anode and cathode, building up over time. Inevitably, they diminish ...

Liquid metals come to the rescue of semiconductors

Moore's law is an empirical suggestion stating that the number of transistors doubles every few years in integrated circuits (ICs). However, Moore's law has started to fail as transistors are now so small that current silicon-based ...

Scientists propose multifunctional liquid metal nanocapsules

Liquid metals (LMs) are promising for applications in flexible electronics and biomimetic functional composites. Nanometerization and surface modification of LMs are usually used to improve their substrate affinity and processing ...

Using viscous metals in micro fibers

EPFL scientists have developed the first micro-structured fibers with a viscous metal inside—a perfect example of what cross-disciplinary teamwork can achieve.

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