Related topics: microorganisms

Researchers find key to solving serious wine grape issue

Grapevine Trunk Diseases, or GTDs, are the bane of vineyard owners worldwide, and as of 2012, were responsible for more than $1.5 billion in annual economic damages. While researchers have long known that a host of pathogenic ...

Genetic defect leads to motor disorders in flies

In their study, the research groups looked at a protein called Creld. A study from Bonn had recently been able to demonstrate that Creld plays an important role in the development of the heart in mammals. "We wanted to find ...

Nanoengineers boost signals from fluorescent sensors

Fluorescent sensors, which can be used to label and image a wide variety of molecules, offer a unique glimpse inside living cells. However, they typically can only be used in cells grown in a lab dish or in tissues close ...

Researchers realize efficient hydrogen-peroxide production in acid

As one of the 100 most important chemicals in the world, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is mainly produced by the energy- and waste-intensive anthraquinone oxidation (AO) method. Replacing the AO method with a more environmentally-benign ...

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Hydrogen peroxide

Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a very pale blue liquid, slightly more viscous than water, that appears colorless in dilute solution. It is a weak acid, has strong oxidizing properties, and is a powerful bleaching agent. It is used as a disinfectant, antiseptic, oxidizer, and in rocketry as a propellant. The oxidizing capacity of hydrogen peroxide is so strong that it is considered a highly reactive oxygen species.

In organisms, hydrogen peroxide is naturally produced as a byproduct of oxygen metabolism; virtually all possess enzymes known as peroxidases, which harmlessly and catalytically decompose low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen.

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