Related topics: microorganisms

Producing less costly, greener hydrogen peroxide

Australian researchers led by the University of New South Wales have used the Australian Synchrotron to understand how the chemical structure of an advanced catalytic material contributes to its stability and efficiency. ...

Worms freeload on bacterial defence systems

Scientists have untangled a sensory circuit in worms that allows them to choose whether to spend energy on self-defence or rely on the help of nearby bacteria, a new study in eLife reveals.

Gentler, safer hair dye based on synthetic melanin

With the coronavirus pandemic temporarily shuttering hair salons, many clients are appreciating—and missing—using hair dye to cover up grays or touch up roots. Whether done at a salon or at home, frequent coloring, however, ...

Heavy use of hand sanitizer boosts antimicrobial resistance

Since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, scientists and governments have been advising people about the best hygiene practices to protect themselves. This advice has caused a significant surge in the sale and use of cleaning ...

page 1 from 19

Hydrogen peroxide

Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a very pale blue liquid, slightly more viscous than water, that appears colorless in dilute solution. It is a weak acid, has strong oxidizing properties, and is a powerful bleaching agent. It is used as a disinfectant, antiseptic, oxidizer, and in rocketry as a propellant. The oxidizing capacity of hydrogen peroxide is so strong that it is considered a highly reactive oxygen species.

In organisms, hydrogen peroxide is naturally produced as a byproduct of oxygen metabolism; virtually all possess enzymes known as peroxidases, which harmlessly and catalytically decompose low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA