Related topics: fish · climate change · coral reefs

Are otters threatening amphibian populations?

The Eurasian otter typically eats fish, but amphibians, which are in global decline, are also part of its diet, especially when fish are scarce. In a Mammal Review study, researchers identified bones of amphibians in otter ...

Shipwrecks off NC coast harbor tropical migrants

Tropical and subtropical fish are taking up residence on shipwrecks and other sunken structures off the North Carolina coast. This pattern may continue or even accelerate in coming years given predictions of warming oceans ...

Climate change will redistribute tuna

The increase in skipjack and yellowfin tuna in the tropical area, and the movement of the rest of the species (albacore, Atlantic bluefin tuna, bigeye tuna and southern bluefin tuna) towards colder waters are the main conclusions ...

How do species adapt to their surroundings?

Several fish species can change sex as needed. Other species adapt to their surroundings by living long lives, or by living shorter lives and having lots of offspring. The ability of animals and plants to change can sometimes ...

Thumbs up for marine blueprint in the Mediterranean

Thanks to a trailblazing marine protection initiative in Turkey, the tide may finally be turning for the Mediterranean monk seal – one of the world's most threatened marine mammals.

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List of Minnesota fish

The List of Minnesota fish lists fish found naturally in Minnesota waters, including Lake Superior. According to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Minnesota is home to 158 fish species.

The species data on this page is taken from the Minnesota DNR, which also uses several labels to indicate a fish's status within Minnesota waters. An endangered fish species is near extinction in Minnesota, a threatened species is likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future, and a special concern species is either extremely uncommon in Minnesota or has unique or highly specific habitat requirements.

Several types of Minnesota fish are considered non-native invasive species. A prohibited invasive species is illegal to possess in Minnesota without a permit, and a regulated invasive species is legal to possess but still may not be released into public waters. Many invasive fish species are nonetheless already well-established.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA